Author Topic: Dermatitis [Atopic] Herpetiformis: Celiac Disease of the Skin  (Read 21439 times)

Offline abbilynn

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I have a friend who's daughter has atopic dermatitis.  I started reading "Special diets for special kids" and it said that it is likely an allergy to gluten, similiar to celiac disease.  It did not expand on it though.  Does anyone know about this or of any books that could help her?  Her doctor only suggested giving the child a constant dose of Benedryl to relieve the itching.  Any help would be appreciated! :-\
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Offline healthybratt

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Re: Dermatitis [Atopic] Herpetiformis: Celiac Disease of the Skin
« Reply #1 on: July 18, 2006, 07:30:12 AM »
I have a friend who's daughter has atopic dermatitis.  I started reading "Special diets for special kids" and it said that it is likely an allergy to gluten, similiar to celiac disease.  It did not expand on it though.  Does anyone know about this or of any books that could help her?  Her doctor only suggested giving the child a constant dose of Benedryl to relieve the itching.  Any help would be appreciated! :-\

Celiac disease, dermitis, eczema and other disorders are often caused by a more serious underlying problem.  Read this thread for information on Leaky Gut and Candida.
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Offline Mrs. Dugger

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Re: Dermatitis [Atopic] Herpetiformis: Celiac Disease of the Skin
« Reply #2 on: July 18, 2006, 09:00:26 AM »
Doctors drive me nuts sometimes!   ::)

If she has medical insurance, she should try and get allergy testing done.  BUT your friend has to be very forceful with the doctors, and be willing to switch doctors, to get answers.

I didn't have atopic dermatitis, but here's my experience.

I had bouts of hives starting at puberty that got progressively worse, until finally I had an episode of aniphilactic shock and almost died.  So I saw an allergy specialist (my regular doctor didn't seem to think I needed to see one before this!) who determined (I already figured this out, thank you very much) that it was excercise-induced.  I only broke out after I had done physical activity, although not every time I was active.  Anyway, the allergy specialist said it wasn't worth testing to find out what was really causing it because it could be "so many things" and they "might never find it." So his solution?  Take a lot of Benadryl and NEVER EXERCISE.  Of course I was a teenager and didn't know any better than to take a doctor's advice as being the final authority.

So I eventually had a "slip-up" and ended up back in the ER again with anaphilaxis, and this time I had a good ER doctor who couldn't believe what the allergy specialist had told me, and he referred me to another specialist who he knew was one of the best in the state.  I saw that doctor and it was totally different.  It was like he actually cared about healing rather than moving patients in and OUT of his office.  He immediately ordered blood allergy tests, (not the poke-the-skin kind) and within a couple of weeks we found out that I was allergic to wheat, rye, and melons.  All I had to do was cut that out of my diet, and I was able to excercise again without fearing for my life. 

Then I switched insurance and I couldnt' see that doctor anymore and I got a new allergy specialist a few years later, because I wanted to find out if anything had changed.  But I only got another money-hungry doctor who didn't care again.  So anyway, I would just encourage her to keep finding answers and not give up.  Don't accept just medicating the symptoms.  Her poor body is saying "something is wrong" and covering up those signals won't do anything for her.

One last comment; I heard that Swedish people have more problems with gluten than other people groups.  Maybe if she's part Swedish you might be on to something gluten related?

Offline Mrs. Dugger

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Re: Dermatitis [Atopic] Herpetiformis: Celiac Disease of the Skin
« Reply #3 on: July 18, 2006, 12:08:18 PM »
PS -- I have heard also that celiac disease causes leaky gut.  Stats are pretty high for people having it and being undiagnosed.

Offline StephTallent

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Re: Dermatitis [Atopic] Herpetiformis: Celiac Disease of the Skin
« Reply #4 on: July 18, 2006, 12:20:33 PM »
PS -- I have heard also that celiac disease causes leaky gut.  Stats are pretty high for people having it and being undiagnosed.

This is definitely something to check out.  My co worker was (well, still is but he's not my co worker anymore!  ::) ) a Celiac.  It is something to research with any gluten sensitivities. 
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Offline MomOf6Girls

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Re: Dermatitis [Atopic] Herpetiformis: Celiac Disease of the Skin
« Reply #5 on: July 18, 2006, 04:42:10 PM »
Well, I can tell you my experience with eczema.  We don't personally suffer from it, but I do have a friend whose son was diagnosed with it at the age of 4 months old.  He was put on steroid creme and was told that he would have to use it for the rest of his life.   Last November I introduced her to Melaleuca products, including Renew lotion, and she started using that, plus the detergent to wash their clothes with, and within a few weeks his eczema cleared up, and to this day, hasn't come back.   Renew is what I use for diaper rash and my husband uses to prevent his hands from cracking open.  It helps relieve severely dry skin associated with chronic skin conditions like psoriasis, rosacea, diabetes, and dermatitis.  We keep it in almost every room of the house.  :-)     
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Offline healthybratt

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Re: Dermatitis [Atopic] Herpetiformis: Celiac Disease of the Skin
« Reply #6 on: July 19, 2006, 12:21:40 PM »
PS -- I have heard also that celiac disease causes leaky gut.  Stats are pretty high for people having it and being undiagnosed.

From what I've read, leaky gut causes celiac disease.   :-\
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YoopreMama

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Re: Dermatitis [Atopic] Herpetiformis: Celiac Disease of the Skin
« Reply #7 on: May 23, 2007, 12:45:35 PM »
I am hopeful!   :)  Praise the Lord! 

Many of you know that I have been battling and researching a rash that has been very itchy >:( --unlike the typical eczema I've been accustomed to.  Allergy-testing today (scratch test on back) revealed no definitive allergies, but a blood test (RAST) was done and is being sent to a lab for analysis. 

In the meantime, I keep hearing from people that gluten could be the cause.  Well...a friend recommended "Celiac Disease:  A Hidden Epidemic" (2006, Dr. Peter H. R. Green), after seeing my skin (she has Celiac's).  I got it from the library and skipped to the chapter on skin disease.  It echoes (so far) much of April's research below:

Quote
Re: Eczema: Causes, Treatments & Cures
Quote from: likemanywaters on May 20, 2007, 03:14:39 PM

I looked up dermatitis herpetiformis on Wikipedia and GET THIS!!

Dermatitis herpetiformis (DH) or Duhring's Disease, is a skin disorder often associated with celiac disease. It is a chronic, extremely itchy rash consisting of papules and vesicles. Dermatitis herpetiformis is associated with sensitivity of the intestine to gluten (or casein!) in the diet (celiac sprue).

Dermatitis herpetiformis usually begins in the twenties, though children may sometimes be affected. It is seen in both men and women. Though the cause of the rash is unknown (i know!), dermatitis herpetiformis is frequently associated with gluten (a protein found in cereals) sensitivity in the small bowel.

Dermatitis herpetiformis breakouts are usually extremely itchy. In many people the vesicles or papules appear on the elbows, knees, back, and buttocks (pressure points). It may also present as a patch of red skin with little water blisters scattered about. It is a systemic condition; the unpredictable skin rash may appear or be exacerbated by any irritation such as dry skin, scratching or clothing that is rough or scratchy. The fact that the rash is most prevalent at pressure points (where clothing rubs the most) may be why the symptoms sometimes appear to be symmetrical.  IT IS!  Called a "mirror image".

The all-over dry skin jaundiced looking rash DS had while eating a diet high in carbohydrates was affecting him in the lower GI tract, causing THAT kind of rash. After removing gluten (& ALL carbs, so as to not feed any possible bacteria) from his diet we majorly increased his dairy, not understanding the similarities between gluten & casein. The intense red rashes behind his knees & wrists returned & got worse. SO, all over rash (especially on the lower back over where the colon was), gluten. Intense red small rashes specifically behind the knees & wrists, casein!!


I'll be quoting from the book in the days to come as I read more.  Anyone know more?   ???

YoopreMama

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Re: Dermatitis [Atopic] Herpetiformis: Celiac Disease of the Skin
« Reply #8 on: May 23, 2007, 02:07:00 PM »
Abbilynn! ;D
I have a friend who's daughter has atopic dermatitis.  I started reading "Special diets for special kids" and it said that it is likely an allergy to gluten, similiar to celiac disease.  It did not expand on it though.  Does anyone know about this or of any books that could help her?  Her doctor only suggested giving the child a constant dose of Benedryl to relieve the itching.  Any help would be appreciated! :-\

Look up dermatitis herpetiformis..."celiac disease of the skin".  You're right on! 

Here's a good site for support:
http://www.dermatitisherpetiformis.org.uk/faqs/faqdiagnose.html

I'm reading "Celiac Disease: A Hidden Epidemic" (2006, Peter Green, MD)...Ch. 11 deals w/ the skin problem...
« Last Edit: May 23, 2007, 02:40:36 PM by YooperMama »

Offline healthybratt

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Re: Dermatitis [Atopic] Herpetiformis: Celiac Disease of the Skin
« Reply #9 on: May 23, 2007, 02:33:58 PM »
Look up dematitis herpetiformis..."celiac disease of the skin".  You're right on! 

PS I just started a thread on it, but here's a good site for support:
http://www.dermatitisherpetiformis.org.uk/faqs/faqdiagnose.html
These two threads have been merged.
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YoopreMama

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Re: Dermatitis [Atopic] Herpetiformis: Celiac Disease of the Skin
« Reply #10 on: May 23, 2007, 03:31:29 PM »
Anyone w/an itchy, unknown rash suspecting a gluten connection?

These two threads have been merged.

Thanks, HB!  :D

Offline likemanywaters

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Re: Dermatitis [Atopic] Herpetiformis: Celiac Disease of the Skin
« Reply #11 on: May 23, 2007, 04:58:28 PM »
From: http://www.dermatitisherpetiformis.org.uk/faqs/faqdiagnose.html
Quote
How is dermatitis herpetiformis diagnosed?

The diagnosis of DH is made by a simple skin test. A small piece of skin approximately 3 mms in diameter is taken from an unaffected area, ie. normal looking skin. The skin is examined for the presence of a substance called IgA (immunoglobulin A) and is found at a specific site in the skin. Although the test is simple, it is important a laboratory experienced in the procedure undertakes the examination of the skin.

The diagnosis of DH can also be confirmed with the same tests as used for diagnosing coeliac disease, ie. a small intestinal biopsy and blood tests looking for specific antibodies, called anti-endomysial and tissue transglutaminase antibodies. Occasionally in DH, the blood tests may be negative because their positivity correlates strongly with the severity of the intestinal lesion.

Ah HA!!!! I have been thinking all week about that very word, "lesion", and wondering if DS has an intestinal lesion in his upper GI somewhere, maybe duodenum.  I would LOVE to have that test done on him to test for the transglutaminase antibodies!! I wonder how invasive a small intestinal biopsy is? I do not really want to put him under anesthesia. I wonder if you could just get the skin sample checked by itsself.

Also, is there any way to "get rid of" theses auto-antibodies, or are they there for life?

In some research on celiacs I've read this:
Quote
From: http://www.springerlink.com/content/rxpmyj5a1wj5kw9j/

Conclusion. In the present study, we demonstrated that mucosal specimens taken from the distal duodenal and jejunal mucosa are strongly correlated. Clinically significant discrepancies were present in only 6% of paired biopsies. Therefore we suggest that, in diagnosis and follow-up of celiac disease, mucosal specimens may be taken from the duodenum using forceps to obtain adequate material for histological interpretation.

But then again.... if I'm already sure gluten/casein is aggrivating it, is there any point in paying for a procedure to prove what I already know?
« Last Edit: May 23, 2007, 05:10:24 PM by likemanywaters »
And, behold, the glory of the God of Israel came from the way of the east: and his voice was like a noise of many waters: and the earth shined with his glory.

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YoopreMama

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Re: Dermatitis [Atopic] Herpetiformis: Celiac Disease of the Skin
« Reply #12 on: May 23, 2007, 09:03:23 PM »
From: http://www.dermatitisherpetiformis.org.uk/faqs/faqdiagnose.html
Quote
How is dermatitis herpetiformis diagnosed?

The diagnosis of DH is made by a simple skin test. A small piece of skin approximately 3 mms in diameter is taken from an unaffected area, ie. normal looking skin. The skin is examined for the presence of a substance called IgA (immunoglobulin A) and is found at a specific site in the skin. Although the test is simple, it is important a laboratory experienced in the procedure undertakes the examination of the skin.

The diagnosis of DH can also be confirmed with the same tests as used for diagnosing coeliac disease, ie. a small intestinal biopsy and blood tests looking for specific antibodies, called anti-endomysial and tissue transglutaminase antibodies. Occasionally in DH, the blood tests may be negative because their positivity correlates strongly with the severity of the intestinal lesion.

I wonder how invasive a small intestinal biopsy is? I do not really want to put him under anesthesia. I wonder if you could just get the skin sample checked by itself.

But then again.... if I'm already sure gluten/casein is aggravating it, is there any point in paying for a procedure to prove what I already know?

likemanywaters,
From what I've read, the biopsy is done through an endoscopy where you are put under and a fiber endoscope tube is sent down your throat.  Some w/ DH don't have a positive result for that biopsy b/c the celiac is latent there...The skin biopsy sounds pretty reliable. And, I'd think, too, that if you are on the GF or GF/DF diet and it's working, well then, why have extra test?

That same site you mentioned has a good page of links on DH for more info--here's one article:
http://www.csaceliacs.org/DermatitisHerpetiformisandDietaryGlutenIlluminatingaGut-SkinConnection.php
« Last Edit: May 23, 2007, 11:03:11 PM by YooperMama »

Offline likemanywaters

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Re: Dermatitis [Atopic] Herpetiformis: Celiac Disease of the Skin
« Reply #13 on: May 24, 2007, 01:51:48 AM »
I find it very interesting that the sight http://www.dermatitisherpetiformis.org.uk/faqs/faqdiagnose.html talks about most patients showing improvement after taking the antibiotic dapsone (sp?). And then they go on to say they don't know why this works.  ::) I have felt all along that my son has had bacterial overgrowth/infection in there instead of yeast. I'm going to once again start using more of the natural antibiotics.
« Last Edit: January 28, 2008, 07:12:32 AM by likemanywaters »
And, behold, the glory of the God of Israel came from the way of the east: and his voice was like a noise of many waters: and the earth shined with his glory.

-Ezekiel 43:2

YoopreMama

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Re: Dermatitis [Atopic] Herpetiformis: Celiac Disease of the Skin
« Reply #14 on: May 24, 2007, 02:15:54 AM »
I find it very interesting that the site http://www.dermatitisherpetiformis.org.uk/faqs/faqdiagnose.html talks about most patients showing improvement after taking the antibiotic dapsone . And then they go on to say they don't know why this works.  ::)

From what I'm learning, Dapsone was an early antibiotic (the 40s, m/b?), but doesn't work like a typical antibiotic.  "It blocks the inflammatory process in the skin lesions, but it does not affect the IgA deposits under the dermis or the ongoing immune response" (p. 129, CD: Hidden Epidemic). 

It only suppresses the itching and lesions themselves--it also lists side effects and the need for physician monitoring.  Many on that board of DH have no trouble being on it for years (low dose).  They recommend NOT doing systemic steroids for the rash--you need high doses and that can aggravate the vulnerability to bone loss.

They also discuss the bruising that happens...due to 3 factors:
1) malabsorption of vit. K, resulting in coagulation probs.,bleeding and bruising,
2) idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP), an autoimmune reaction against the platelets resulting in bruising and bleeding,
3) scurvy, due to a lack of vit. C & resulting in fragile capillaries & bruising.

Offline likemanywaters

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Re: Dermatitis [Atopic] Herpetiformis: Celiac Disease of the Skin
« Reply #15 on: May 24, 2007, 06:20:11 AM »
That same site you mentioned has a good page of links on DH for more info--here's one article:
http://www.csaceliacs.org/DermatitisHerpetiformisandDietaryGlutenIlluminatingaGut-SkinConnection.php

Thank you! That was an awesome site. It explained exactly what I have been wondering about the possible reasons for the placements of rashes and them being a direct reflection of the inflammation/condition of the gut.  It's amazing to me that all these things have been researched already. If that was Spring 2004, I wonder what Hall's more recent research is finding...  I just think it's ironic that they don't look to natural things, like aloe vera juice and such, as possible therapy.

So in an attempt to get DS' gut healed, I've decided to purree his food for a week. (After seeing him gobble down his chicken last night, hardly chewing any of it.)

I wonder if they are sure the Dapsone is not actually killing off something...
And, behold, the glory of the God of Israel came from the way of the east: and his voice was like a noise of many waters: and the earth shined with his glory.

-Ezekiel 43:2

YoopreMama

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Re: Dermatitis [Atopic] Herpetiformis: Celiac Disease of the Skin
« Reply #16 on: May 24, 2007, 03:30:55 PM »
likemanywaters--

Have you looked up Hall and any current research yet?   :D

I thought I'd add here, too, that diluted ACV is doing great things for my skin--no soap, and still hydrating w/ EVOO & calendula.

And cookbooks...have a good one by Bette Hagman from the library.   :)

I want to find a good forum for those w/ celiac and ask how they are working to prevent their children from developing it...I know breastfeeding helps...do they limit gluten already in childhood before symptoms come up?  I think I'm going to do that for a bit and see what happens...

Found one!  http://www.celiacforums.com/
« Last Edit: May 29, 2007, 12:51:21 PM by YooperMama »

YoopreMama

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Re: Dermatitis [Atopic] Herpetiformis: Celiac Disease of the Skin
« Reply #17 on: May 29, 2007, 12:50:10 PM »
I called the allergist today to see if she'd prescribe the Dapsone for the itching until the gluten-free diet can take over.  I think I got some gluten this weekend in my mayo ("modified food starch"), and am struggling w/ the skin again.  :'(

I deplore medications, but this is starting to get wearisome on it's 5th month and I do have some concerns about infections from the scratching (let alone scarring).  I'll find out Thursday when she's back in the office.

likemanywaters--how's your DS?   ???

Offline likemanywaters

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Re: Dermatitis [Atopic] Herpetiformis: Celiac Disease of the Skin
« Reply #18 on: May 29, 2007, 02:27:09 PM »
He's doing better! Thanks for asking. We went camping this weekend and today his skin is looking much better. I've started putting coconut oil on it again & it seems to be helping.  Of course I feed him some too. Had to wash him w/soap after the camping trip  :D and it didn't seem to hurt.

I ordered a couple stool & urine test kits from http://www.greatplainslaboratory.com but I'd have to have a doc to sign on the papers for me... Still not sure what I'm going to do yet.  I'm excited though that I met a chiropractic neurologist the other day that I think would listen & be helpful to me, but once again not sure yet...

I've been purreeing all his food & that seems to help, but a pain  ::). It's actually easier to just give him baby food jars which is what I did for breakfast & he pooped great this morning!! Still giving him aloe vera juice to chugg, just bummed that they all have preservatives of some kind in them.

I couldn't find anything about any current research by Hall. I'm tempted to email the guy. If he's at Duke in NC, he's kind of close to us anyways.
And, behold, the glory of the God of Israel came from the way of the east: and his voice was like a noise of many waters: and the earth shined with his glory.

-Ezekiel 43:2

Offline likemanywaters

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Re: Dermatitis [Atopic] Herpetiformis: Celiac Disease of the Skin
« Reply #19 on: May 29, 2007, 03:02:52 PM »
Quote
Researchers in Norway think that transglutaminase facilitates the physical linkage of the carboxamide group of an amino acid called glutamine in gluten to an epsilon-amino group of a lysine residue in transglutaminase in the intestinal tract. (The normal physiological function of transglutaminase is probably the repair of injured or inflamed tissue by cross-linking extracellular matrix proteins in the tissue, thus stabilizing the damaged tissue and protecting the surrounding tissue from further damage.)

Since gluten has an abundance of the amino acid glutamine, it is especially vulnerable to this reaction with transglutaminase. This abnormally linked molecule is then perceived as a foreign antigen by the immune system and antibodies to transglutaminase begin to be produced, inhibiting the normal function of transglutaminase in repairing damaged intestinal mucosa.
From: http://www.greatplainslaboratory.com/russian/test16.html

Now my question is... I had been giving my son L-Glutamine b/c I had read on all the information about leaky guts that this amino acid was helpful in repairing the lining of the intestine. But after reading this I'm not so sure... Did I understand this correctly? If someone is having issues with their transglutaminease, then perhaps giving an abundance of this would make it worse? Or is it only the glutamine found in the gluten? Or would it help?  Anyways, I'm definitely stopping giving it to him until I can figure it out.
And, behold, the glory of the God of Israel came from the way of the east: and his voice was like a noise of many waters: and the earth shined with his glory.

-Ezekiel 43:2

YoopreMama

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Re: Dermatitis [Atopic] Herpetiformis: Celiac Disease of the Skin
« Reply #20 on: May 30, 2007, 04:21:48 PM »
Sorry I can't answer anything about your glutamine question.   :(  I think you'll find the answer, though!

I wonder if they are sure the Dapsone is not actually killing off something...

I'm finding out more about how it works a bit at:
http://dermatology.cdlib.org/DOJvol8num1/reviews/dapsone/wolf.html

Here's small bit:

Quote
Mechanisms of action of dapsone in dermatological diseases
Dapsone acts against bacteria and protozoa in the same way as sulphonamides,that is by inhibiting the synthesis of dihydrofolic acid through competition with para-amino-benzoate for the active site of dihydropteroate synthetase. The anti-inflammatory action of the drug is unrelated to its antibacterial action and is still not fully understood. An inflammatory disease which responds to dapsone is almost invariably associated with the infiltration of large numbers of polymorphonuclear leukocytes into the affected tissue. [11]


YoopreMama

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Re: Dermatitis [Atopic] Herpetiformis: Celiac Disease of the Skin
« Reply #21 on: May 31, 2007, 01:34:00 AM »
Some more general information, links w/ photos, etc:

http://www.raysahelian.com/dermatitis.html
Quote
Dermatitis herpetiformis
Dermatitis herpetiformis is characterised by granular IgA precipitates in the papillary dermis. In contrast to other autoimmune blistering diseases, where tissue-deposited and circulating autoantibodies recognise the same target within the skin, in dermatitis herpetiformis a serum IgA reacting with a component of the healthy papillary dermis has not been detected. Recently, the antigenic specificity of pathognomic skin-bound IgA has been clarified: the immune precipitates contain epidermal transglutaminase, an enzyme not previously detected in the papillary region of normal skin. Furthermore, serum IgA in dermatitis herpetiformis has been found to bind epidermal transglutaminase. These findings may relate to the fact, that dermatitis herpetiformis is associated with gluten sensitive enteropathy, coeliac disease, which is characterised by IgA type autoantibodies to a closely related enzyme, tissue transglutaminase.

http://www.aocd.org/skin/dermatologic_diseases/dermatitis_herpeti.html

Quote
The rash is caused when gluten in the diet combines with IgA, and together they enter the blood stream and circulate. They eventually clog up the small blood vessels in the skin. This attracts white blood cells (neutrophils), and releases powerful chemicals called complements. They actually create the rash. Iodine is required for the reaction, so people with DH should avoid using Iodized salt.

The gut may also be affected by this allergy; this is called gluten-sensitive enteropathy (GSE) or celiac disease. Some people only have the GSE, some have GSE and DH and some just DH. It is not known why some develop on and not the other. There are cases of GSE that have turned cancerous (malignant lymphoma) so an evaluation by a gastroenterologist (a medical doctor specializing in the stomach and intestines) is prudent.

There are increased risks for for other diseases (malignancies, autoimmune diseases) w/ celiac, so early diagnosis is important.

http://arthritis.about.com/od/celiac/Celiac_Disease_Diagnosis_Symptoms_Treatment_GlutenFree_Diet.htm,

has some more links about DH and photos, too.

YoopreMama

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Re: Dermatitis [Atopic] Herpetiformis: Celiac Disease of the Skin
« Reply #22 on: June 22, 2007, 05:24:51 PM »
There's a thread somewhere here on dermographism w/ interesting stuff about inflammation and skin troubles...I wonder if that's why EVOO helps my skin so much (Omega 3s, right?).   ???

It has to do more w/ welting or "skin writing" but I still think there's relevant info:
Dermographism

P.S. (HB, SC, herbalmom: I did it! I did it!   ;D)

YoopreMama

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Re: Dermatitis [Atopic] Herpetiformis: Celiac Disease of the Skin
« Reply #23 on: July 16, 2007, 03:54:20 PM »
I had my punch biopsy last Thursday to check for DH (and had 2 moles removed).  The results won't be back 'til m/b later this week, but I wanted to post that experience, regardless.  I'm so glad I can quit the "gluten challenge" now, and get it out of my system!

My dermatologist has tested for DH before, but has only had one positive diagnosis.  She thinks I have classic eczema, exacerbated by wheat.   :-\  ::)

She took two 4 mm punch biopsies (w/ a local anesthetic) from behind my knee--one on affected skin, & one on unaffected skin nearby.  She stitched them up, and they are healing w/ a peroxide wash to keep it clean and Vitamin E oil to keep them moist and healing.  I'm also taking echinacea to prevent infection and to accelerate my skin's healing.

It didn't really hurt; I only felt the tugging sensation from the stitching.   :P  The biopsies were sent downstate for DIF testing (under a special fluorescent light to check for IgA [gluten antibodies, I think]).

I am reading a book on gluten sensitivities now (2007--The Gluten Connection) and realizing that Celiac Disease is full-blown gluten-sensitivity...that you can have gluten sensitivity w/o CD.  I read about DH in there and continue to think that's what I'm dealing w/:

--A gluten-free diet clears up my skin; gluten results in a rash w/i 24-48 hours.
--High doses of omega-3s [cod liver oil] are also really helping my skin (see the "Inflammation & Diet" thread),
--W/ Vitamin E. applied topically for healing of lesions.

I'll post when the results come back.


Offline abbilynn

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Re: Dermatitis [Atopic] Herpetiformis: Celiac Disease of the Skin
« Reply #24 on: July 16, 2007, 05:11:43 PM »
Glad it went well for you!  I was thinkin' about ya!  :D  I, too, believe you can have a gluten sensitivity without having full-blown celiac.  Also, I'm finding that when the gluten is built up in my system, the reaction comes and goes.  But when I go gluten free, then re-introduce it, within 24 hours I have that yucky rash on my hand (weird that it only appears there!).  Also, I have a stomach ache and I just feel "edgy."  Anyway, let us know as soon as you get your results!  :)

abbilynn
Wife for 11 years, Mommy to 3 rambunctious boys!!  :)  Lover of Jesus, my hubby, my kids, and learning!
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http://glutenfreegoose.blogspot.com/

Offline likemanywaters

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Re: Dermatitis [Atopic] Herpetiformis: Celiac Disease of the Skin
« Reply #25 on: July 17, 2007, 07:42:49 AM »
Still not sure what I'm going to do yet.  I'm excited though that I met a chiropractic neurologist the other day that I think would listen & be helpful to me, but once again not sure yet...

So we saw the chiro that I was considering.  It went great.  Actually the first thing he said to us was, "I bet you'ld like to know what kind of doctor I am. Well, I have three kids that have never seen an MD or had immunizations."  ;D  He says he has treated many kids with "malabsorption" problems with numerous "allergies" that clear right up after a few spine adjustments. My son's head was turned funny during labor & they used the vacuum tube & when he came out the cord was wrapped around his neck. Hmmm. I'd never have put the two together with digestive problems though. I actually went in expecting to talk about some of the other ideas I researched. He says he sees it a lot though. He felt & adjusted a few places on his neck & back & we are supposed to go back tomorrow and a few more times. So we'll see what happens.....
And, behold, the glory of the God of Israel came from the way of the east: and his voice was like a noise of many waters: and the earth shined with his glory.

-Ezekiel 43:2

YoopreMama

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Re: Dermatitis [Atopic] Herpetiformis: Celiac Disease of the Skin
« Reply #26 on: July 26, 2007, 02:40:15 AM »
Hi, likemanywaters-- :)
The chiropractor sounds interesting.  Ours has some unusual approaches to various conditions, too--not just adjustments but some other techniques w/ pressure on particular points of the body.  He's believer, too, and I've been seeing him on and off for about 15 years.  I wonder if we have a thread on chiropractor testimonies...hmmm...our daughter had some scar tissue on one side of her neck from a forceps delivered C/S...he treated her 3-4 times and we saw some real health gains, interestingly enough.

Why Do YOU Go To A Chiropractor?

Back to the topic at hand.... ::)

My biopsy results are in, but I have to wait another week until the Dr. comes back from vacation!  She doesn't like for nurses to give tests results--she'd rather do it.  I'm trying not to read anything into that.  I guess I'll hear next Mon/Tues.   :-\

Offline likemanywaters

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Re: Dermatitis [Atopic] Herpetiformis: Celiac Disease of the Skin
« Reply #27 on: July 26, 2007, 04:14:19 AM »
DS is doing much better!  I Chiro has been adjusting his spine several times now. And all his rashes are healing! :):):)  He said something about malabsorption of nutrients & slow digestion being linked to the spine/neurological system & the signals were not getting through. That his own metabolism was very toxic to himself (I didn't totally understand him). So far, it's helping. :D  AND I added a bunch of stuff, incl. wheat back to his diet & he is still improving. That is what also makes me think this is finally it.
« Last Edit: February 15, 2010, 08:28:57 PM by likemanywaters »
And, behold, the glory of the God of Israel came from the way of the east: and his voice was like a noise of many waters: and the earth shined with his glory.

-Ezekiel 43:2

YoopreMama

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Re: Dermatitis [Atopic] Herpetiformis: Celiac Disease of the Skin
« Reply #28 on: July 31, 2007, 02:25:17 AM »
My skin biopsies finally came back...the moles were negative for cancer, as well as the 2 punch biopsies for DH.  :(  She said that the skin samples under the DIF light looked like eczema w/ something sub-??? that showed something irritates it (really?).   ::)  She didn't rule out gluten bothering it; I just didn't test positive for celiac of the skin.   :-\  So....I'm still going to stay away from gluten (and dyes and corn syrup)... :-X
Josiah is doing much better!  I Chiro has been adjusting his spine several times now. And all his rashes are healing! :):):)  He said something about malabsorption of nutrients & slow digestion being linked to the spine/neurological system & the signals were not getting through. That his own metabolism was very toxic to himself (I didn't totally understand him). So far, it's helping. :D  AND I added a bunch of stuff, incl. wheat back to his diet & he is still improving. That is what also makes me think this is finally it.
That's incredible, LMW!  I'm so glad he is doing better.  :)  I'll have to ask my chiropractor about that...

Offline calina

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Re: Dermatitis [Atopic] Herpetiformis: Celiac Disease of the Skin
« Reply #29 on: September 04, 2007, 02:38:48 AM »
My daughter was born six years ago covered head to toe in a rash.  The pregnancy was normal except the fact that I felt her moving much more and sooner than my previous two.  She was an extremely fussy baby.  She began screaming every night at 9 pm and went on till 4 am. Her skin was red and inflammed.  We went to dr after dr trying to get help.  They checked her zinc levels (just a little low), did a skin biopsy (ruled out ichthyosis, cystic fibrosis - it had to be some type of psoriasis or eczema.  You need a medical degree to figure that one out?!?)  They prescribed 3 tsp of atarax a day for my infant.  At this point, we did as we were told and gave it to her.  She began throwing screaming fits, pinching me till I bruised, pulling her hair and beating her head against the door.  I told the dr.  He said, "But it cleared her skin."  We took her off that.  Did I mention she was exclusively breast fed? It was the foods I was eating. Finally I went to a natural pharmacy in my area.  They recommended an ELISA food allergy test.  The test showed she was allergic to wheat, gluten, milk, corn, soy and some other minor things.  She's never actually been confirmed celiac/dh, but gluten intolerant diagnosis explains enough to me. BTW, when we gave her children's advil for fever she became suicidal at 2 years of age.  She said she wanted to be hit by a car and tried to run out to the road.  We figured out it was the red dye, so your friend may want to rethink the benadryl.  Highly allergic kids sometimes have bizarre symptoms that you may think are unrelated.  Anyhow, we took those allergens out of her diet (and mine-breastfed) and she improved.  She was off all antihistamines at this point.  We had additional testing done through great plains laboratory.  Determined that she did in fact have candida.  Dr. put her on prescription antifungal nystatin.  She began having regular bowel movements, red rash gone, cracked and dry skin began healing within 2-3 weeks. No longer using prescription hydrocortisone cream or any moisturizer.  Another finding you mentioned special diets for special kids, her autistic symptoms improved.  Especially the extreme sensitivity to sights and sounds and ADHD.  She still has some issues, but I think they are mostly learned behaviors and we're working on them.  Another book you might find interesting is Unraveling the Mystery of Autism by Karen Seroussi.  BTW, if you choose the conventional medical route, this is something you're really going to have to be persistent about because their studies show that most celiac/dh occurs between the ages of 30's - 60's.  Not common in children.