Author Topic: Iodine: Sources, Inhibitors, Symptoms of Deficiency  (Read 140220 times)

Offline mexmarr

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Re: Iodine: Sources, Inhibitors, Symptoms of Deficiency
« Reply #30 on: February 07, 2007, 11:29:34 AM »
What about taking kelp powder to increase iodine?  How can you know how much iodine you are getting and if it is too much?

Talkinh gbout kelp.... I'm gonna bump up my earlier question.

You can buy kelp tablets that have the amount of iodine per tablet listed.

I don't have kelp tablets, but I do have kelp powder, empty capsules and a little capsule maker.  I have 00 size capsules.  Would 1 full capsule a day be good?

Offline blessedmamadp

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Re: Iodine: Sources, Inhibitors, Symptoms of Deficiency
« Reply #31 on: February 07, 2007, 11:37:19 AM »
Iodine has the highest number on the relative atomic weight scale in relation to these halogen toxins. Next comes Bromine, Chlorine, Flourine (flouride). What this means is that Iodine can be displaced by any of the lighter toxic halogens. Bromine can be displaced by Chlorine or Flourine; Chlorine by Flourine. BUT the reverse is not true. Iodine cannot displace the lighter toxins. I surmize that this is why treatment for Iodine deficiency takes 3 to 6 months. The body needs time to build new receptors and let the Iodine do its work, ridding itself of the toxins through your urine and other means. Urine testing is how the process is monitored.

My hubby has this to say:

If the reverse of the above is not true, meaning Iodine cannot displace those other elements, then how can you ever regain a balance of Iodine in the system?

Offline SC

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Re: Iodine: Sources, Inhibitors, Symptoms of Deficiency
« Reply #32 on: February 07, 2007, 11:50:57 AM »
What about taking kelp powder to increase iodine?  How can you know how much iodine you are getting and if it is too much?

Talkinh gbout kelp.... I'm gonna bump up my earlier question.

Where Else Can I Get Iodine?

Kelp can help with iodine levels, however there's no way to know how much you are getting as it will vary. When you are trying to correct a defficiency, you'll want to know how much you are taking so you'll know whether to interpret your symptoms as detox or as a need to decrease your dosage. Dr. Brownstein agrees with that opinion.

I found a list of iodine rich foods. I offer this list here for those who are looking for ways to enrich their iodine sources. However, if you are suffering from symptoms of iodine deficiency, you'll need more than just a maintainance dose. Added to this is the consideration that our agricultural lands are now considered deficient in iodine. It is a safe assumption that you would have to eat much more of these foods than you would have years ago to get the same result -- even if the food is organic -- WITH THE EXCEPTION OF KELP and COD LIVER OIL. These foods draw their iodine from the ocean waters and retain their richness. But the caution about iodine deficient people still applies.

Radishes
Asparagus
Carrots
Tomatoes
Spinach
Rhubarb
Potatoes
Peas
Strawberries
Mushrooms
Lettuce
Bananas
Cabbage
Egg Yolk
Onions
Kelp
Cod Liver Oil

Why can't I just paint my skin with the stuff I buy at the store?
Here's what Dr. Hulda Clark says in her book, The Cure For All Diseases

Quote
  It is too dangerous to buy a commercially prepared solution. It is certain to be polluted with propyl alcohol or wood alcohol. Maker it yourself or ask your pharmacist to make it up for you. The recipe to make 1 liter (quart) is:

44 gm (1 1/2 ounces) iodine, granular
88 gm (3 ounces) potassium iodide, granular

  Dissolve the potassium iodide in about a pint of the [distilled] water. Then add the iodine crystals and fill to the liter mark with water. It takes about 1 day to dissolve completely. Shake it from time to time. Keep out of sight and reach of children. Do not use if allergic to iodine. Be careful to avoid bottled water for preparation.


Where can I get a good source of iodine?

You can do a search for Lugol's Iodine Solution on the internet. Just be sure that you find a source that is not for use other than human. In other words, don't get the stuff used in fish tanks or to prepare laboratory slides. You want Lugol's Iodine Solution. Dr. Clark did not have anyone she trusted to recommend in her book, but I spotted some solutions made for human/internal use.

There is a tablet form that was made for better controls by a company called Optimox Research Corporation in CA. The tablets are called Iodoral. The formulation is made to deliver 5 mg iodine and 7.5 mg iodide. They include a thourough information sheet with a list of potential side effects and much more.


What is the best way ensure my body uses the iodine I take?

Dr. Jarvis found this interesting tidbit when he was doing his study. If you suspend the iodine in an acid reactive medium, he observed that this made the iodine more bio-available and more of the iodine was utilized by the body. So, he advised his patients to consume a glass of water with a spoonful of organic apple cider vinegar in which a drop of Lugol's Iodine Solution had been mixed.
« Last Edit: February 07, 2007, 12:54:04 PM by SC »
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Offline SC

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Re: Iodine: Sources, Inhibitors, Symptoms of Deficiency
« Reply #33 on: February 07, 2007, 11:54:20 AM »
Iodine has the highest number on the relative atomic weight scale in relation to these halogen toxins. Next comes Bromine, Chlorine, Flourine (flouride). What this means is that Iodine can be displaced by any of the lighter toxic halogens. Bromine can be displaced by Chlorine or Flourine; Chlorine by Flourine. BUT the reverse is not true. Iodine cannot displace the lighter toxins. I surmize that this is why treatment for Iodine deficiency takes 3 to 6 months. The body needs time to build new receptors and let the Iodine do its work, ridding itself of the toxins through your urine and other means. Urine testing is how the process is monitored.

My hubby has this to say:

If the reverse of the above is not true, meaning Iodine cannot displace those other elements, then how can you ever regain a balance of Iodine in the system?


Tell hubby to re-read the highlighted portion above. You keep your intake of iodine at an elevated level while trying to regain the balance so that as your cells continue to multiply, there is iodine available for those new receptors. As the 'genuine article' begins to do it's work, iodine can dispense with those cells which have toxins in their receptors. HTH
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Offline healthybratt

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Re: Iodine: Sources, Inhibitors, Symptoms of Deficiency
« Reply #34 on: February 07, 2007, 12:19:42 PM »
Can you do the paint test with cheap stuff for booboos from Walmart or do you have to get a special kind?
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Offline herbalmom

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Re: Iodine: Sources, Inhibitors, Symptoms of Deficiency
« Reply #35 on: February 07, 2007, 12:34:05 PM »
Gotcha. 

BRAT!

To be honest, I have heard STRANGER questions than yours about the salt, although I did wonder a little bit coming from you.

I thought that she said "Gotcha" meaning that what you said answered her question and she understood....  Maybe I'm wrong... I'd better go before I stich my foot in my mouth....  ;)

I didn't think about it that way, so maybe I put my foot in my mouth, I've been doing that a lot lately. ::) ::) So ShabbyChic, which way did you mean it? If you meant that you understood, then I apologize. If you meant Ha Ha, I got you, good joke. Either way- still friends?

What about taking kelp powder to increase iodine? How can you know how much iodine you are getting and if it is too much?

Talkinh gbout kelp.... I'm gonna bump up my earlier question.

You can buy kelp tablets that have the amount of iodine per tablet listed.

I don't have kelp tablets, but I do have kelp powder, empty capsules and a little capsule maker. I have 00 size capsules. Would 1 full capsule a day be good?

If you are taking a multi that has iodine (Super Mom does) then you may not need any kelp, although when I was pregnant I took a good multi & kelp as well since kelp has a lot more in it than just iodine. Kelp tablets are compressed kelp & although I've never crumbled one to see how much kelp is in one my guess is that it is 1/3 to 1/2 of a "00" capsule. I usually take more than 1 kelp tablet a day when I am taking them because I seem to be low thyroid but I also take them spread out throughout the day just like I do with my multi. I plan to get the book SC recommended & check into it further. Anyway, I don't think 1 "00" of kelp a day is going to hurt you but you have to decide for yourself. If you want to use less kelp, you could mix the kelp with alfalfa or dandelion root powder. Both are high in vits & trace minerals & dandelion supports the liver & is used to prevent & treat anemia & PUPPP. You can find out about PUPPP on this thread:
Really itchy rash started during 3rd trimester... HTH

You can also use kelp in cooking. It brings out the flavor of other foods although if you use too much it tastes fishy just like you would expect seaweed to taste. Some brands taste better than others so if you don't like 1 brand, try another. We used to use ParKelp brand now we just use the one that our local HFS (Vitamin Cottage) sell in their bulk foods. We use it in cooking all the time & keep it in a spice shaker jar with a lid & use it at the table as well. You can't use kelp if you have an allergy to iodine & some people that are allergic to MSG can't use kelp. My DH is allergic to MSG but has no problems w/kelp so it is an individual thing. Kelp can be used in soups, sauces, chili, spaghetti sauce, bean dishes, grain dishes, meatloaf, spice blends, etc. HTH Blessings ~herbalmom

Offline mexmarr

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Re: Iodine: Sources, Inhibitors, Symptoms of Deficiency
« Reply #36 on: February 07, 2007, 12:42:05 PM »

You can also use kelp in cooking. It brings out the flavor of other foods although if you use too much it tastes fishy just like you would expect seaweed to taste. Some brands taste better than others so if you don't like 1 brand, try another. We used to use ParKelp brand now we just use the one that our local HFS (Vitamin Cottage) sell in their bulk foods. We use it in cooking all the time & keep it in a spice shaker jar with a lid & use it at the table as well. You can't use kelp if you have an allergy to iodine & some people that are allergic to MSG can't use kelp. My DH is allergic to MSG but has no problems w/kelp so it is an individual thing. Kelp can be used in soups, sauces, chili, spaghetti sauce, bean dishes, grain dishes, meatloaf, spice blends, etc. HTH Blessings ~herbalmom

What does kelp have to do with MSG?  I got mine from the Bulk Herb Store.

I tried it in a salt shaker.  Blah! Nasty!!! :P My MIL does that and puts it on her eggs in the morning, but I just couldn't stand the flavor.  I'd be scared to add it to a food that I like in fear of ruining my food....  I guess I don't have to worry much about that right now, anyway.  I don't cook now that I am on couchrest....

Offline SC

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Re: Iodine: Sources, Inhibitors, Symptoms of Deficiency
« Reply #37 on: February 07, 2007, 12:53:37 PM »
Can you do the paint test with cheap stuff for booboos from Walmart or do you have to get a special kind?
bump
See Reply #32
"Why can't I just paint my skin with the stuff I buy at the store?"
« Last Edit: February 07, 2007, 12:56:28 PM by SC »
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Offline herbalmom

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Re: Iodine: Sources, Inhibitors, Symptoms of Deficiency
« Reply #38 on: February 07, 2007, 01:29:45 PM »

You can also use kelp in cooking. It brings out the flavor of other foods although if you use too much it tastes fishy just like you would expect seaweed to taste. Some brands taste better than others so if you don't like 1 brand, try another. We used to use ParKelp brand now we just use the one that our local HFS (Vitamin Cottage) sell in their bulk foods. We use it in cooking all the time & keep it in a spice shaker jar with a lid & use it at the table as well. You can't use kelp if you have an allergy to iodine & some people that are allergic to MSG can't use kelp. My DH is allergic to MSG but has no problems w/kelp so it is an individual thing. Kelp can be used in soups, sauces, chili, spaghetti sauce, bean dishes, grain dishes, meatloaf, spice blends, etc. HTH Blessings ~herbalmom

What does kelp have to do with MSG?  I got mine from the Bulk Herb Store.

I tried it in a salt shaker.  Blah! Nasty!!! :P My MIL does that and puts it on her eggs in the morning, but I just couldn't stand the flavor.  I'd be scared to add it to a food that I like in fear of ruining my food....  I guess I don't have to worry much about that right now, anyway.  I don't cook now that I am on couchrest....

I thought about the couch rest while I was typing my post but I figured I would tell you about cooking with it anyway. I don't like it on eggs either but DH & kids do. It just depends what you put it on. You won't taste a sprinkle in soup, for example. Start w/small amount in cooking- you won't taste a pinch or 2 in a big pot of soup or chili.

As far as kelp & MSG- kelp contains natural MSG, that's why it brings out the flavor in food. Commercial MSG was originally made from kelp but like everything else manufactures figured out other ways to do make it. In people that are VERY sensitive to MSG kelp can cause problems. Most people can use kelp with no problems. HTH Blessings ~herbalmom

Offline heatheronthehill

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Re: Iodine: Sources, Inhibitors, Symptoms of Deficiency
« Reply #39 on: February 07, 2007, 04:38:42 PM »
[quote author=herbalmom
If you are taking a multi that has iodine (Super Mom does) then you may not need any kelp, although when I was pregnant I took a good multi & kelp as well since kelp has a lot more in it than just iodine.
[/quote]


I'm so thrilled to learn this!  YAY SUPERMOM!!!   ;D 

So the bottle says that it contains 100% of the daily value, which is 150 mcg.  What is the recommended amount?  SC was saying that it was actually more the what is typically recommended as the daily value.  Just wondering if I can feel pretty safe knowing I'm getting enough from the SuperMoms, or if I should look into some other sources.


Offline boysmama

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Re: Iodine: Sources, Inhibitors, Symptoms of Deficiency
« Reply #40 on: February 07, 2007, 05:09:16 PM »

You can also use kelp in cooking. It brings out the flavor of other foods although if you use too much it tastes fishy just like you would expect seaweed to taste. Some brands taste better than others so if you don't like 1 brand, try another. We used to use ParKelp brand now we just use the one that our local HFS (Vitamin Cottage) sell in their bulk foods. We use it in cooking all the time & keep it in a spice shaker jar with a lid & use it at the table as well. You can't use kelp if you have an allergy to iodine & some people that are allergic to MSG can't use kelp. My DH is allergic to MSG but has no problems w/kelp so it is an individual thing. Kelp can be used in soups, sauces, chili, spaghetti sauce, bean dishes, grain dishes, meatloaf, spice blends, etc. HTH Blessings ~herbalmom
Hmmm... I now understand!  ;D I had mentioned awhile back on the cheap seasonings thread that a pinch of kelp really enhanced other flavors even though you can't taste it... I discovered that by putting a pinch of kelp in anything I thought would cover the fishy flavor :)
BTW I am sensitive to the MSG that comes in processed foods, but kelp has never bothered me even when I take it plain :P

Offline ShabbyChic

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Re: Iodine: Sources, Inhibitors, Symptoms of Deficiency
« Reply #41 on: February 07, 2007, 05:28:23 PM »
I meant "Gotcha" I understand.  I have a great sense of humor, I am not at all sarcastic, and my feelings are not easily hurt.  Sorry it took me so long to respond; Wednesday night church stuff.
That's Shabby SHEIK not Shabby CHICK.  Hee-hee.

Offline herbalmom

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Re: Iodine: Sources, Inhibitors, Symptoms of Deficiency
« Reply #42 on: February 07, 2007, 05:36:46 PM »

If you are taking a multi that has iodine (Super Mom does) then you may not need any kelp, although when I was pregnant I took a good multi & kelp as well since kelp has a lot more in it than just iodine.

I'm so thrilled to learn this!  YAY SUPERMOM!!!   ;D 

So the bottle says that it contains 100% of the daily value, which is 150 mcg.  What is the recommended amount?  SC was saying that it was actually more the what is typically recommended as the daily value.  Just wondering if I can feel pretty safe knowing I'm getting enough from the SuperMoms, or if I should look into some other sources.

I usually add at least one kelp tablet a day to my multi & I cook with kelp & kombu as well. I figure that sea vegetables have other things in them that the body needs & that help iodine to be used more effectively. See my earlier posts on this thread for info about cooking w/kelp & kombu.  Just my .02. HTH


You can also use kelp in cooking. It brings out the flavor of other foods although if you use too much it tastes fishy just like you would expect seaweed to taste. Some brands taste better than others so if you don't like 1 brand, try another. We used to use ParKelp brand now we just use the one that our local HFS (Vitamin Cottage) sell in their bulk foods. We use it in cooking all the time & keep it in a spice shaker jar with a lid & use it at the table as well. You can't use kelp if you have an allergy to iodine & some people that are allergic to MSG can't use kelp. My DH is allergic to MSG but has no problems w/kelp so it is an individual thing. Kelp can be used in soups, sauces, chili, spaghetti sauce, bean dishes, grain dishes, meatloaf, spice blends, etc. HTH Blessings ~herbalmom
Hmmm... I now understand! ;D I had mentioned awhile back on the cheap seasonings thread that a pinch of kelp really enhanced other flavors even though you can't taste it... I discovered that by putting a pinch of kelp in anything I thought would cover the fishy flavor :)
BTW I am sensitive to the MSG that comes in processed foods, but kelp has never bothered me even when I take it plain :P

That's exactly the way it is with my DH. Blessings ~herbalmom

Offline herbalmom

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Re: Iodine: Sources, Inhibitors, Symptoms of Deficiency
« Reply #43 on: February 07, 2007, 07:16:19 PM »
I meant "Gotcha" I understand.  I have a great sense of humor, I am not at all sarcastic, and my feelings are not easily hurt.  Sorry it took me so long to respond; Wednesday night church stuff.

Oops, thanks for understanding. I totally goofed on that one but I am glad that I was able to answer your question. When you said gotcha I thought that you were joking, not being sarcastic. You have never posted anything that would lead me to believe that you were trying to be sarcastic to anyone. Blessings ~herbalmom

Offline blessedmamadp

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Re: Iodine: Sources, Inhibitors, Symptoms of Deficiency
« Reply #44 on: February 08, 2007, 04:08:38 AM »


Why can't I just paint my skin with the stuff I buy at the store?
Here's what Dr. Hulda Clark says in her book, The Cure For All Diseases

Quote
  It is too dangerous to buy a commercially prepared solution. It is certain to be polluted with propyl alcohol or wood alcohol. Maker it yourself or ask your pharmacist to make it up for you. The recipe to make 1 liter (quart) is:

44 gm (1 1/2 ounces) iodine, granular
88 gm (3 ounces) potassium iodide, granular

  Dissolve the potassium iodide in about a pint of the [distilled] water. Then add the iodine crystals and fill to the liter mark with water. It takes about 1 day to dissolve completely. Shake it from time to time. Keep out of sight and reach of children. Do not use if allergic to iodine. Be careful to avoid bottled water for preparation.




"Do not use if allergic to iodine."  When I was a kid, mom used to mark our faces up like indians with the iodine when we got a "booboo."  She stopped because I broke out in a rash.  So, we didn't use it.  But when, as an adult, I gave blood, the worker put iodine on me and I worried I'd break out, but I didn't.

Any ideas what might have happened?

Offline SC

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Re: Iodine: Sources, Inhibitors, Symptoms of Deficiency
« Reply #45 on: February 08, 2007, 04:27:53 AM »


Why can't I just paint my skin with the stuff I buy at the store?
Here's what Dr. Hulda Clark says in her book, The Cure For All Diseases

Quote
  It is too dangerous to buy a commercially prepared solution. It is certain to be polluted with propyl alcohol or wood alcohol. Maker it yourself or ask your pharmacist to make it up for you. The recipe to make 1 liter (quart) is:

44 gm (1 1/2 ounces) iodine, granular
88 gm (3 ounces) potassium iodide, granular

  Dissolve the potassium iodide in about a pint of the [distilled] water. Then add the iodine crystals and fill to the liter mark with water. It takes about 1 day to dissolve completely. Shake it from time to time. Keep out of sight and reach of children. Do not use if allergic to iodine. Be careful to avoid bottled water for preparation.




"Do not use if allergic to iodine."  When I was a kid, mom used to mark our faces up like indians with the iodine when we got a "booboo."  She stopped because I broke out in a rash.  So, we didn't use it.  But when, as an adult, I gave blood, the worker put iodine on me and I worried I'd break out, but I didn't.

Any ideas what might have happened?
My guess would be that you may have reacted to an ingredient in the solution other than the iodine.

Other than that, it is possible that you were overloaded with toxins as a child and began to develop allergies. As an adult, your environment/diet changed, toxins were eliminated, your body's systems rebuilt (this is key) and your immune response settled down such that you no longer had an allergic response.

I say this because I developed allergies as a young adult. They were eliminated by this method (after I got tired of being constantly medicated). I can now partake of foods and be in environments that would have caused awful reactions for me in the past.
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Offline healthybratt

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Re: Iodine: Sources, Inhibitors, Symptoms of Deficiency
« Reply #46 on: February 08, 2007, 07:27:35 AM »
Can you do the paint test with cheap stuff for booboos from Walmart or do you have to get a special kind?
bump
See Reply #32
"Why can't I just paint my skin with the stuff I buy at the store?"
Thanks.  Guess I missed that.   ::)  Isn't there an easier way to get this stuff?  Like a health food store or something?  I got enough going on without trying to chase down a pharmacist and trying to talk him into something off the cuff.   :-\  This is probably one for instance where convenience will win over attention to detail.  (sad but true as this in not normally the case). ::)
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Offline SC

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Re: Iodine: Sources, Inhibitors, Symptoms of Deficiency
« Reply #48 on: February 08, 2007, 05:14:27 PM »
Additional Information:
Diets that may cause iodine deficiency are:
1. Diets without ocean fish or sea vegetables
2. Low iodized salt diets
3. High consumption of bakery products containing bromide
4. vegan and vegetarian diets

Specific conditions that iodine can treat include:
ADD
Breast Diseases
Dupuytren's Contracture
Excess Mucous
Fatigue
Fibrocystic Breasts
Hemorrhoids
Headaches
Keloids
Migraine Headaches
Ovarian Disease
Parotid Duct Stones
Peyronie's
Sebaceous Cysts
Thyroid Disorders
Vaginal Infection

Question: How likely are men to have Iodine Deficiency and why?
Same as for a woman. Dr. Brownstein believes that it is a factor in prostate cancer. He says that men don't show signs of the deficiency as early or as strong as women because of the number of cell receptors in men being less than women (breast tissue, fat cells). However, in terms of fatigue and hormone imbalance, the men suffer also. As the cell receptors grab whatever substance is available instead of iodine, the body's functions become inefficient, resulting in some of the same complaints women have suffered.

What are some of the symptoms of Iodine Deficiency?
This is just a partial list:
brain fog
depression
fatigue/low energy
difficulties at work
poor eyebrow growth
slow reflexes
puffiness under eyes
dry skin
low basal body temperature (normal 97.8-98.2)
mental retardation/deficiency
cretinism/deafness
delayed physical/mental development
goiter
hypothyroidism
hyperthyroidism
thickened tongue
infertility
headaches
insomnia
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Offline SC

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Re: Iodine: Sources, Inhibitors, Symptoms of Deficiency
« Reply #49 on: February 09, 2007, 04:47:41 AM »
I found these instructions for an at home patch test for iodine deficiency. I haven't tried it myself, but they use Dr. Guy Abraham as a reference. Dr. Abraham wrote the preface to Dr. Brownstein's book (Iodine, Why You Need It etc.).

http://www.wellnesswithin.com/articles/Iodine%20Patch%20Test.pdf
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Offline blessedmamadp

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Re: Iodine: Sources, Inhibitors, Symptoms of Deficiency
« Reply #50 on: February 10, 2007, 04:48:21 AM »
I LOVE salt.  I cannot live without it.  When I met my hubby, he asked why I salted everything before I tasted it.  So, I cut out salt for a while, my blood pressure dropped and I was nearly passing out constantly.  The college nurse said my BP was 80 over 50!  The doctor was puzzled and suspected sugar problems.  I started eating salt again and haven't quit.  The problem went away.

When I was pregnant with my second child, my midwife suggested I switch to sea salt.  I used a lot more of it.  I was convinced that the salt was "evaporating."  I couldn't taste it and literally salted everything between bites.  I began to suspect it wasn't the salt, but iodine.

I do have brain fog, fatigue, depression, headaches and low body temp.  BUT as my hubby pointed out when I was looking at the symptoms of hormonal imbalance (which I had 13 out of the list) are similar to many other illnesses.

I guess I'll have to get some good iodine and test.

I didn't see low blood pressure on the list?  Is it likely that the iodine caused the trouble or salt???

Offline Pastorswife2B

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Re: Iodine: Sources, Inhibitors, Symptoms of Deficiency
« Reply #51 on: February 11, 2007, 03:02:06 PM »
Ok salt question...  Sea salt in the crystals does not have iodine in it???? but celtic sea salt does have iodine in it?!?!

I'm just confused!

Offline blessedmamadp

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Re: Iodine: Sources, Inhibitors, Symptoms of Deficiency
« Reply #52 on: February 11, 2007, 07:31:20 PM »
Unfortunately, I cannot get Celtic sea salt without ordering it online.  I buy "Iodized Sea Salt" from wal-mart.  I don't know if Celtic sea salt has iodine or not, but I've heard it is better for you.

I don't know if that clears up your questions or not, HTH.

Offline Mama Sita

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Re: Iodine: Sources, Inhibitors, Symptoms of Deficiency
« Reply #53 on: February 20, 2007, 09:57:09 AM »
Here's something very interesting that my Dad sent to me today. I thought it would be appropriate to post it here.

SSKI Iodide
http://www.tahoma-clinic.com/iodide.shtml

Check it out. See what you think.

MS
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Offline SC

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Re: Iodine: Sources, Inhibitors, Symptoms of Deficiency
« Reply #54 on: March 01, 2007, 03:32:56 AM »
A lack of iodine can affect your I.Q. as much as 15 points, and your height by as much as ten centimeters, according to one nutritionist.

The Dutch people recently made headlines by becoming the tallest people in the world. Scientists are tracing it directly back to nutrients and minerals in the diet, specifically iodine. See two reports here:

http://www.oberlin.edu/alummag/oamcurrent/oam_may99/tall.html
http://www.newyorker.com/printables/fact/040405fa_fact?fact/040405fa_fact
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Offline mykidsmom

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Re: Iodine: Sources, Inhibitors, Symptoms of Deficiency
« Reply #55 on: March 10, 2007, 06:35:23 PM »

I just finished reading the book by Dr.Brownstein on Iodine and I just ordered my iodine tablets.  Question, is anyone taking the iodine pills?  If so, how much are you taking?  I was trying to avoid taking the 24hr urine test (been there done that for cortisol - yuck) but I will if I have to.  Do I just start with one tab and go from there?

SC, are you taking the iodine?  Notice any differences if you are?  Thanks for book info.  It's very good!  And I actually think it's another piece to the puzzle I've been working on in my body. 

Patti
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Offline SC

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Re: Iodine: Sources, Inhibitors, Symptoms of Deficiency
« Reply #56 on: March 11, 2007, 07:57:04 AM »

I just finished reading the book by Dr.Brownstein on Iodine and I just ordered my iodine tablets.  Question, is anyone taking the iodine pills?  If so, how much are you taking?  I was trying to avoid taking the 24hr urine test (been there done that for cortisol - yuck) but I will if I have to.  Do I just start with one tab and go from there?

SC, are you taking the iodine?  Notice any differences if you are?  Thanks for book info.  It's very good!  And I actually think it's another piece to the puzzle I've been working on in my body. 

Patti

I'm glad you've enjoyed your book! I have found that it is very difficult to get the Lugol's Iodine solution (at a reasonable price) in liquid form for human consumption. You can't get it over the counter at your local pharmacy here in the US now because of problems and restrictions that the FDA has begun due to the abuses by illegal drug manufacturers.

I purchased the tablets as well and have seen some improvements. I recommend (as does Dr. Brownstein) that you monitor your condition with the testing. However, I know that there are many who cannot or will not go that route.

Having said that, my best suggestion would be that you read the book THOROUGHLY and become well acquainted with any side effects and/or symptoms. If you are using Idoral, he discusses in the book the dosage for deficiencies (4 per day/ 2 a.m. & 2 p.m.) over a period of 3 months. Then, you back off of the dosage gradually and monitor your symptoms. I would think reducing the tablets by one every 3 or 4 days. If you don't have any symptoms, then the maintenance dose is 1 per day to make sure you don't get deficient again. If you have symptoms trying to reduce your dosage, he says to continue at the 4 per day another 3 months and then back off again until you find your maintenance dosage.

Again, this is only for people who are aware of the risks involved, have taken the time to educate themselves and are comfortable going ahead without having their condition monitored by lab tests. HTH
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Offline mykidsmom

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Re: Iodine: Sources, Inhibitors, Symptoms of Deficiency
« Reply #57 on: March 11, 2007, 06:50:38 PM »
Thanks, SC.  I'll have to go back and reread sections of the book on dosing.  I have to admit I read this book from cover to cover in 3 hrs late one night.  I started it at 10:00 and finished it at 1:00 or 1:30am.   It was a good book!   ;D  It made so much sense I just wanted to get through it.  I'll go back and recheck the dosing sections.  It probably wouldn't hurt for me to test - being lazy I guess.   :-\  Since I am on thyroid meds (Armour) I'm anxious to see if this makes a difference. 

As always, thanks for passing on the good info.

patti
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Offline daisey

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Re: Iodine: Sources, Inhibitors, Symptoms of Deficiency
« Reply #58 on: March 23, 2007, 08:07:59 AM »
I have just finished reading a book that I would encourage anyone with endocrine/hormone/fibroid disease and/or breast/prostate cancer to read.

With that broad endorsement, let me tell you how I ‘found’ it. I had gone to the local pharmacy to ask if they could compound an iodine solution for me. After some research, I planned to paint it onto my skin and see how quickly it absorbed to determine if I had thyroid problems. The lab work I had done came back within normal range, but in medical terms, that means roughly “We aren’t quite ready to call 9-1-1.”

The chain store couldn’t do what I wanted but referred me to a little locally owned store that does compounding. I walked into that store and asked the friendly staff if they could compound the solution for me. For some reason, one of the ingredients was available only by prescription (although combined, they could be purchased OTC). So, she couldn’t compound the solution. She questioned me about what I wanted to use it for and the application I would choose.

By my answers, she could tell I had made other dietary adjustments, and she recommended this book. I purchased it on the spot. You see my research from different sources kept mentioning iodine. I had been reading some work by Dr. D.C. Jarvis and Dr. Hulda Clark in addition to other authors on women’s health. Each had veered into discussions on the importance of iodine, but never really explained (to my feeble mind) why. Well this book does.


Iodine, Why You Need It Why You Can’t Live Without It, 2nd Edition is 200 pages of “Well, THAT makes sense!” It’s like I finally found the missing piece to the puzzle. It was a great $15 investment.

You can read on a related thread about my research on hormone imbalance and the issues related to that. I speculated as to why women who had never had hormone medications were being found to have this imbalance and the problems that come along with it. The environmental factors explain a bit of it, but the number of women affected in such drastic ways left me wondering if there wasn’t another reason. There is. Many of us are iodine deficient.

Dr. Brownstein goes into great detail to describe how to test for iodine deficiency and why he tests in this way. He gives appendixes with resources for supplies, lab work, etc. The book is written in a way that provides other physicians/practitioners with the supporting documentation they need to treat their own patients, yet it is written in a way that even someone like me can understand.

In addition to explaining in detail why our bodies NEED iodine to function properly, he also tells why our levels are so low. He tells of chemicals in our environment, food and water supply that mimic iodine chemically, fooling the receptors in our bodies to attach to these toxins, causing all sorts of domino effects. Did you know that fluoride and a common ingredient in store bought bread are two chemicals which do this? Did you know that water used to irrigate organic produce has one of these chemicals?

He also discusses natural sources of iodine that should be a part of your daily diet, but he goes on to say that to correct a deficiency, you need larger doses. He outlines testing for deficiency, therapeutic treatment, recovery and maintenance.

Before you get too concerned, he goes on to explain how wonderfully our bodies are made; such that if you get iodine at the levels you NEED, your body will naturally detoxify itself of the copycat toxins and replenish its stores with iodine. He shows this with charts of lab work that he did on his own patients.

But what does all of this have to do with hormone imbalance?

Iodine helps regulate the endocrine system which in turn regulates hormone production. When enough iodine does not exist, the body has to make choices as to which cells receive the little iodine available. This means, that organs not deemed critical to survival do not get as much as organs like the thyroid gland gets. This means that the ovaries, prostate, and breast tissue that would normally have iodine do without or try to use one of the toxins in your diet/environment. They malfunction and hormonal imbalance can begin, exacerbated by the phytoestrogens in plants, and other estrogens in drugs, environmental chemical contamination, etc.

How can an iodine deficiency contribute to cancer?

Iodine in the body helps regulate cell division – especially in breast, uterine, ovary and prostate glands. Iodine is like the referee that helps cells know when they should stop dividing and die as they would in a normal life cycle. Without iodine, the cells begin to multiply rampantly. This is called cancer.

In some patients with these cancers – if they use a holistic approach, meaning they change their diets to safer foods and treat hormonal imbalances as well as taking proper vitamin supplementation – the cancers (and fibroids) have been shown to reverse, disintegrating from the center of the tumor out. Why? The iodine begins to do its work of regulating the cells’ division and life cycle. The cells begin to die off as they should and the cancer cannot sustain itself.

He even has a question and answer section that discusses Hashimoto’s and Graves’ disease, goiter, palpitations, antioxidant properties, and cancer of the thyroid to name a few items.

I just wanted to let any of you who are still struggling after changing diet and trying desperately to find solutions for thyroid malfunctions/hormonal issues/fibroids/fatigue, etc. that there is a publication out there that addresses an additional piece of the puzzle.

Oh, and I hope I didn’t mislead anyone to think this is only in relation to women’s health. He also outlines the difficulties iodine deficiency causes in men’s and children’s health.

Hi SC
Can you tell me where you found this book and how much you paid for it.   I am needing to do some serious research on Thyroid and noticed your post.  Thanks
Daisey
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Offline daisey

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Re: Iodine: Sources, Inhibitors, Symptoms of Deficiency
« Reply #59 on: March 23, 2007, 04:38:03 PM »
Can someone tell me how you would monitor your Thyroid if you are trying to do a natural treatment without a Dr. helping you?   
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