Author Topic: All about whey  (Read 22905 times)

Offline mexmarr

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All about whey
« on: September 19, 2006, 02:43:37 AM »
There has been enough talk about whey here and there, that it seems like it needs it own thread.

I know of two ways, at least, to get whey.  Strain your yogurt, and you get cream cheese and whey.  And make cheese from milk to get cheese and whey.  (Hmm both are cheese, maybe that is just one way.... :o)

If you make cream cheese once, you should get enough whey to last quite a while, if you are new to using it.  If you aren't new, you probably make more cream cheese than that anyway ;D.  The whey lasts a lot longer than the cheese.  I think that it was 6 months in the fridge.

My first question is about the difference in whey made from yogurt, and whey made from fresh milk.  Is only the yogurt whey considered fermented?  Is it better for you?

What do you do with your whey.  Or what did you try that didn't work.

Offline mexmarr

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Re: All about whey
« Reply #1 on: September 20, 2006, 05:23:00 PM »
Bump, i am really interested in the difference in whey made from yogurt and the whey from fresh milk!

Offline AgainstTheGrain

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Re: All about whey
« Reply #2 on: September 20, 2006, 05:40:41 PM »
This is just a guess . . . remembering what my mom said that my grandma use to do when she was little to make "cottage cheese" and whey. She would put a pail of raw milk (straight from the cow ohhh those were the days!) on the back of the stove (think woodburning stove that's warm all the time from the fire burning in it) and just let it sit there until it separated from souring. Then she would strain off the whey to use for bread and have the "cottage cheese". The cheese was quite bitter as they added sugar to it. My mom STILL adds sugar to her cottage cheese because that's the way she grew up eating it.

So, from that process, I would say that it is definately fermented! ;)  There is a blog site about homesteading that I'm sure someone would have an answer to I'll try and find it and post it. ;)


I found it . . . http://www.homesteadblogger.com/home.php  Since it's a blog not a discussion board, it may not be as useful, but hopefully it'll lead to something. ???
« Last Edit: September 20, 2006, 06:50:38 PM by AgainstTheGrain »
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Offline healthyinOhio

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Re: All about whey
« Reply #3 on: September 21, 2006, 03:06:39 AM »
I use my whey when a NT recipe tells me to.  Otherwise, I would not know what to do with it. Hey, I am a city girl.  ;)
But what I did notice is that my goat's milk whey and cow's milk whey is very different.  The goat's milk is clear in color and it is very light.  The cow's milk is yellow/green(just like urine) in color and is a little thicker like mucous.  It does make the dishes a little runny like snot, so I am preferring the goat's milk whey, but I just don't like the goat's cheese that it leaves behind like I do the cow yogurt cheese.

Offline LoveSunflowers

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Re: All about whey
« Reply #4 on: September 21, 2006, 05:06:52 AM »
I too, use it for NT recipes. I also mix a little bit extra in my yogart. The whey I am using is from cottage cheese my SIL made with raw cow's milk. It does last awhile. I read somewhere that you can make ricotta cheese with whey, however, when my SIL made it she said it tasted horrible. :( I also read that you can cook your paste and beans in whey for extra nutrients. I haven't tried it yet, but I thought it sounded like a good idea. I also know that my husband's aunt uses it to feed the pigs. :) I hope I was helpful.
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Offline Simply Kristen

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Re: All about whey
« Reply #5 on: December 11, 2006, 07:09:14 AM »
I've got about 3 qts of whey. It lasts about 6 months right?

My whey came from kefir and cow's milk (organic, pastuerized, skim milk).

I am interested in making ricotta cheese and fermenting carrots (to start with).
Any tips?

Also, there is a tiny bit of kefir in my whey. Do I need to get it all out?

Offline lotsaboys

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Re: All about whey
« Reply #6 on: December 11, 2006, 10:22:09 AM »
I've got about 3 qts of whey. It lasts about 6 months right?

My whey came from kefir and cow's milk (organic, pastuerized, skim milk).

I am interested in making ricotta cheese and fermenting carrots (to start with).
Any tips?

Also, there is a tiny bit of kefir in my whey. Do I need to get it all out?

From our experience, little bits of kefir or cream cheese in the whey doesn't matter as long as its used in a few months time. I say that because we always have a little yogurt or cream cheese in ours and the longest its ever been in the fridge is 3-4 months. Maybe with more time it could turn bad.

Offline lotsaboys

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Re: All about whey
« Reply #7 on: December 11, 2006, 10:28:34 AM »


My first question is about the difference in whey made from yogurt, and whey made from fresh milk.  Is only the yogurt whey considered fermented?  Is it better for you?

What do you do with your whey.  Or what did you try that didn't work.

We really prefer making curds and whey with yogurt because the cream cheese that's left is much more palatable than that made from fresh milk souring on the countertop for days! I tried using the fresh milk cream cheese in several different ways and we just wouldn't handle it. But made from yogurt its much more like store bought, in fact, I think better!

The main ways we use our whey is for fermenting veggies and we all love porridge  (cooked oatmeal) for breakfast that has been soaked overnight. That is 1 cup rolled oats in 1 cup water with 2 T. whey. Yum!

Offline ShabbyChic

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Re: All about whey
« Reply #8 on: January 26, 2007, 12:30:54 PM »
Okay, I have about 2 cups of whey.  Now what?  What can I do with it?  I do not have a NT cookbook.  I've read about sprouting grains, but you have to rinse the grains every 12 hours and does that mean I use whey each time?  I don't have enough for that; I'd have to use water.  So what else can I do besides make pancakes or waffles?
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Re: All about whey
« Reply #9 on: January 26, 2007, 12:48:45 PM »
Okay, I have about 2 cups of whey.  Now what?  What can I do with it?  I do not have a NT cookbook.  I've read about sprouting grains, but you have to rinse the grains every 12 hours and does that mean I use whey each time?  I don't have enough for that; I'd have to use water.  So what else can I do besides make pancakes or waffles?

From Sally Fallon's Nourishing Traditions p. 95...

Ginger Carrots

4 cup grated carrots
1 tbsp grated ginger
2 tbsp sea salt*
4 tbsp whey

In a bowl, mix all ingredients and pound with a wooden pounder or meat hammer to release juices. Place in a quart-sized, wide mouth mason jar and press down firmly with a pounder or meat hammer until juices cover the carrots. The top of the carrots should be at least 1 inch below the top of the jar. Cover tightly and leave at room temperature for about 3 days before transfering to cold storage.

*In my own personal experience, don't add all this salt right away. It's too much I think. You might need half of it to start and can always add some later. Make sure to use high quality sea salt like Celtic Sea Salt.

Also you have to work on those carrot shavings for a good 10 minutes or so. Great arm workout!



Offline thatgirl

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Re: All about whey
« Reply #10 on: January 26, 2007, 12:50:48 PM »
So what do you all do with your yogurt cream cheese?

Offline Pastorswife2B

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Re: All about whey
« Reply #11 on: January 26, 2007, 01:11:45 PM »
we like it slightly sweetend with honey and mixed with ripe fruit for dessert.

Offline lotsaboys

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Re: All about whey
« Reply #12 on: January 29, 2007, 07:20:55 AM »
So what do you all do with your yogurt cream cheese?

I use it to make a taco chip dip- layer cr. cheese, refried beans, salsa and cheddar or jack cheese and warm in oven!

Offline healthyinOhio

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Re: All about whey
« Reply #13 on: January 29, 2007, 07:23:32 AM »
So what do you all do with your yogurt cream cheese?

Couple TBSP EVOO, two cloves garlic; minced, little Celtic sea salt, couple TBSP chopped fresh herbs(parsely, chives, thyme, etc)

Offline tropix

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Re: All about whey
« Reply #14 on: January 30, 2007, 07:08:53 PM »
I have some whey that is in a plastic bottle. After reading about kambucha ("don't store it in plastic because it will break it down and detox it") I have to wonder if whey is not going to do something similar?

Offline 4my3rascals

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Re: All about whey
« Reply #15 on: March 04, 2007, 10:02:01 AM »
I use my whey when a NT recipe tells me to.  Otherwise, I would not know what to do with it. Hey, I am a city girl.  ;)
But what I did notice is that my goat's milk whey and cow's milk whey is very different.  The goat's milk is clear in color and it is very light.  The cow's milk is yellow/green(just like urine) in color and is a little thicker like mucous.  It does make the dishes a little runny like snot, so I am preferring the goat's milk whey, but I just don't like the goat's cheese that it leaves behind like I do the cow yogurt cheese.
I agree with the differences between the goat and cow's milk whey & cream cheese.  I just used Seven Stars Farm Organic Whole Milk Yogurt to make curds and whey...the whey is more like from the goat, but the cream cheese is superior to both the cow and the goat's milk cream cheese.  It must be the added enzymes to make the yogurt.

Offline levi

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Re: All about whey
« Reply #16 on: March 07, 2007, 03:03:23 AM »
Can people who are allergic to cow's milk have whey from cow's milk kefir or yougurt?

Offline healthyinOhio

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Re: All about whey
« Reply #17 on: March 07, 2007, 04:01:24 AM »
Can people who are allergic to cow's milk have whey from cow's milk kefir or yougurt?

I think it would be safe to try as long as you are using RAW milk whey.  I am allergic to cow's and goat's milk and it gives me a stomach ache every time I would drink pasteurized or homogenized.  Raw does not bother me one bit.

Offline lotsaboys

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Re: All about whey
« Reply #18 on: March 07, 2007, 05:49:27 AM »
Can people who are allergic to cow's milk have whey from cow's milk kefir or yougurt?

And normally, those who cannot tolerate cow's milk have no problem with whey. In fact, whey mixed with water is a great substitute for milk in recipes.

Offline morningglory

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Re: All about whey
« Reply #19 on: March 05, 2008, 06:36:18 AM »
So in the Nourishing Traditions recipes that call for whey, can I use kefir whey from store bought milk?  I haven't found a source for raw milke yet, but I want to try sauerkraut.

Offline Whiterock

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Re: All about whey
« Reply #20 on: March 05, 2008, 06:38:48 AM »
You can, but I've found that I like the sauerkraut better when I make it with just the salt.

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Offline healthyinOhio

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Re: All about whey
« Reply #21 on: March 05, 2008, 06:40:37 AM »
You can, but I've found that I like the sauerkraut better when I make it with just the salt.

WR

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Offline mom24boys

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Re: All about whey
« Reply #22 on: March 10, 2008, 01:33:50 PM »
Okay, I have finally got my kefir to quit being sour curds and whey (another whole topic is on that!) but now there is no whey separating out on the top of my kefir. 

How do you get your whey?

Offline Mrs. B

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Re: All about whey
« Reply #23 on: March 10, 2008, 01:40:16 PM »


How do you get your whey?
I get mine from homemade yogurt (made from raw milk)....   I put the yogurt in cheese cloth inside of a strainer and let it sit for a couple of hours...apply pressure by gently squeezing the cheesecloth...
The yogurt can be used as a cream cheese and the liquid strained out is the whey.
See a closer look here: http://www.homeschoolblogger.com/seethebluesky/483299/

Offline lotsaboys

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Re: All about whey
« Reply #24 on: March 10, 2008, 02:07:19 PM »


How do you get your whey?
I get mine from homemade yogurt (made from raw milk)....   I put the yogurt in cheese cloth inside of a strainer and let it sit for a couple of hours...apply pressure by gently squeezing the cheesecloth...
The yogurt can be used as a cream cheese and the liquid strained out is the whey.
See a closer look here: http://www.homeschoolblogger.com/seethebluesky/483299/

This is my favorite way to make whey. :D The cream cheese is very pleasant tasting and its so simple! You could do the same thing with kefir, but IMO the cream cheese is more sourish.

Offline ArmyWife

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Re: All about whey
« Reply #25 on: July 17, 2008, 04:05:30 PM »
I left some kefir a little too long, and before tossing it, am wondering if there's any reason why i can't use the whey portion for soaking my oatmeal, etc. 
Thanks!
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Offline ShannaC

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Re: All about whey
« Reply #26 on: July 17, 2008, 06:39:12 PM »
YES!!! You can use the whey for whatever you want. Also don't throw out the 'cheese'. You can strain it (all day) so all the whey drips out. Then use the 'cheese' as cream cheese. I made a sweet cream one time by adding honey to it.  Or add other spices and spread on crackers/bread.

Offline Sunshine06

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Re: All about whey
« Reply #27 on: August 12, 2008, 12:07:39 PM »
Ok, I got on to ask if I can strain store-bought yogurt to get whey. I want to make sauerkraut. Now I see that WR prefers to make it without whey. So, I guess I'd like to know:

- can I strain store-bought yogurt to get whey? is it not worth it since it's not homemade and/or raw?? (it is organic tho)
- since it's not raw, can I leave it out or should I refrigerate it while straining?
- what's the difference between sauerkraut made with or without whey? do you just omit the whey and follow the basic recipe or do you do something else?

Thanks everyone. :)
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Offline hi_itsgwen

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Re: All about whey
« Reply #28 on: August 12, 2008, 12:13:10 PM »
I have used store bought yogurt to make whey.  I just refrigerated it overnight.  It makes extra thick yogurt which I added yummy berries and stuff to...but I'm noticing that the other ladies here use the leftover yogurt as cream cheese...ingenious!  I've got to try this :)

Re: raw vs. pasteurized.  If you're still getting the enzymes, then there is nutritional value there.  It would be better probably from raw milk, but I just have to use what I've got!
« Last Edit: August 12, 2008, 01:20:33 PM by hi_itsgwen »
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Offline SC

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Re: All about whey
« Reply #29 on: August 12, 2008, 01:02:02 PM »
How do you get your whey?
I use this highly technical, complex method.  ::) ;)
I let a mason jar of raw milk sit on my counter undisturbed.
In 2 to 4 days, the milk will separate into a solid and a liquid.
The solid floats on top of liquid.
I spoon the solid into a clean cloth lining a strainer over a glass bowl.
I let it sit an hour or so until it no longer drips.

Even better, tie the cloth into a loose bag and hang it from a wooden spoon over a tall glass bowl/jar.

The solid white stuff is cream cheese that you can flavor with onions, garlic, salt, berries -- whatever.

The liquid is whey and will keep in a closed glass container in your fridge for 6 months -- but I've had some that kept longer.

With canning season coming on, I try to keep at least a pint to a quart on hand.

Here's an easy way to use it for squash, cucumbers, okra, corn, berries, greens and probably a lot of other stuff . .

Cut up your washed veggies and pack a clean glass mason jar with your produce.
Add 1 tsp (as much as 1 TBSP, but I like less) sea salt, 4 tbsp whey and fill to 1 inch below the rim with filtered water. Give the jar a good shake until the salt dissolves and then let sit on your counter until the water turns a little cloudy (usually about 2 days). Transfer to cool storage. These can be eaten straight from the jar or warmed on the stove or cooked in other dishes. . .

The salt keeps the produce from spoiling while the whey preserves the produce and enhances their nutrient conten.

For the cucumbers, add your choice of seasonings.

Oh, and don't forget to muss your hair and let everyone think you worked REALLY hard. . .  ;) :D :D :D
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