Author Topic: Cooking with Lard: Is it healthy?  (Read 39223 times)

Offline maideninwaiting

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Cooking with Lard: Is it healthy?
« on: December 28, 2006, 07:01:31 PM »
I've read several things here on this site that imply that lard is a good thing to fry stuff in and that just totally goes against everything I've ever been taught- even taught from my hog raising, lard eating, "fat back" seasoning grandparents. So tell me... is lard really safe to fry things in? And how can you use it regulary w/o gaining a ton of fat?  ???
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Offline bakermom

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Re: Cooking with Lard: Is it healthy?
« Reply #1 on: December 29, 2006, 02:17:00 AM »
We had 5 pigs butchered and plan to use the lard to make pie crust etc.  instead of crisco.  I would think it would be better for you since it is natural and we know what the pigs were fed.  We don't plan to replace what we would use butter or certain oils for.

Offline WithLoveAndJoy

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Re: Cooking with Lard: Is it healthy?
« Reply #2 on: January 01, 2007, 01:11:35 PM »
I think that it goes back to the premise that many folks have mentioned in several other threads so far that the more natural the fat is, the easier it is for our bodies to handle.  Eat Fat, Lose Fat by Sally Fallon and Mary Enig is an excellent read on this subject.  I highly recommend it.
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Offline Kansas Girl

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Re: Cooking with Lard: Is it healthy?
« Reply #3 on: January 02, 2007, 07:35:58 AM »
We tried lard last night in our fryer to make french fries and the smell was pretty intense.  Our whole house smelled like lard.   Is all lard like that or is it just the kind I found.  (We found it a a local meat locker and it is pure, nothing added)   Also, I wondered what it would taste like in a pie crust.  I've heard that lard makes the best pie crust, but would it have a faint taste of bacon???  I know I could try it but I hate to ruin a whole pie. . .   Any thoughts? -KG
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Offline Whiterock

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Re: Cooking with Lard: Is it healthy?
« Reply #4 on: January 02, 2007, 08:14:54 AM »
This is the info I was given by the farmer that I buy lard from...
  • All lard has a "meaty" smell.
  • It should be white, if it has color then it was cooked too hot or too long in the rendering process.
  • In spite of the smell it will not taste meaty in pie crusts or pastries.


I haven't made pie crust with it so I don't know but that's what I was told.
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Offline herbalmom

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Re: Cooking with Lard: Is it healthy?
« Reply #5 on: January 02, 2007, 02:12:57 PM »
I wondered what it would taste like in a pie crust.  I've heard that lard makes the best pie crust, but would it have a faint taste of bacon???  I know I could try it but I hate to ruin a whole pie. . .   Any thoughts? -KG


You could try making pie crust cookies to see if you like the taste. That way you wouldn't be out a whole pie if you don't like it. Take some pie crust dough, roll out, cut into shapes, sprinkle w/sugar or cinnamon sugar & bake. I don't make pie crust so I'm not sure about temp. but you should be able to figure that out. HTH Blessings ~herbalmom

Offline mrsfeather

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Re: Cooking with Lard: Is it healthy?
« Reply #6 on: September 10, 2007, 06:27:09 AM »
I'm wondering where to get lard.
I know it's cheap at Wal-Mart but knowing that it comes from animals treated with and fed who-knows-what really does not entice me.
Do I need to buy "organic lard" and is there such a thing?
In Nourishing Traditions SF recommends it if butter is too expensive, so I'm assuming I should be able to find some for cheap...
any ideas?

Offline Roehrmomma

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Re: Cooking with Lard: Is it healthy?
« Reply #7 on: September 10, 2007, 06:36:18 AM »
go to your local meat locker and buy it and they charge like 10 cents a pound.But you have to render it yourself...Worth it.Just get a 1/2 a pot full at a time.I have done this to make soap.Kidney suet is the cleanest fat but DH is at work I do not know if it is beef or pork... :-\

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Offline Gigi

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Re: Cooking with Lard: Is it healthy?
« Reply #8 on: September 10, 2007, 08:15:27 AM »
Lard pie crusts are our family's favorite.  My grandma's always used it, so we have continued the tradition. 

We have never had any sort of "meaty" or "off" flavors in the crust - just really good texture and flakiness.  The lard in the container always smells "meaty" but by the time the crust is cooked, I can't detect it.

HTH

We tried lard last night in our fryer to make french fries and the smell was pretty intense.  Our whole house smelled like lard.   Is all lard like that or is it just the kind I found.  (We found it a a local meat locker and it is pure, nothing added)   Also, I wondered what it would taste like in a pie crust.  I've heard that lard makes the best pie crust, but would it have a faint taste of bacon???  I know I could try it but I hate to ruin a whole pie. . .   Any thoughts? -KG

Offline skelliott2

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Re: Cooking with Lard: Is it healthy?
« Reply #9 on: September 10, 2007, 08:19:17 AM »
go to your local meat locker and buy it and they charge like 10 cents a pound.But you have to render it yourself...Worth it.Just get a 1/2 a pot full at a time.I have done this to make soap.Kidney suet is the cleanest fat but DH is at work I do not know if it is beef or pork... :-\

Em

How do you render lard??  I bought  a pack one time, but didn't know what to do with it!   :-[ :-\

Offline healthybratt

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Re: Cooking with Lard: Is it healthy?
« Reply #10 on: March 10, 2008, 03:32:12 PM »

I still love lard for pie crusts, but I have yet to find any more.

HB, are you saying you can't find lard anymore?  Or is it organic lard or what?

I find lard at every grocery store I go to but I have yet to find organic anywhere other that mail order and that was prohibitive in cost.  I suspect it is now hydrogenated anyway because it was a soapmakers type of website.

Also, regarding pie crusts made with lard, have you found that the crust gets sort of soft (not crispy anymore) after the first day?  Usually this isn't a problem as pies often get eaten within hours of being made around here.  However, I like to make 4-6 kinds for some special dinners and to have leftovers during the week.  These just don't hold over as nicely as the old Crisco crusts did. 

I'm just curious about other's experience.

I can't find unhydrogenated lard as of yet.

Also, try a recipe which includes vinegar.  You might like the results.  Also, don't refrigerate your pies and they will stay crisper longer.
« Last Edit: March 10, 2008, 03:38:01 PM by healthybratt »
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Offline healthybratt

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Re: Cooking with Lard: Is it healthy?
« Reply #11 on: March 10, 2008, 03:35:04 PM »
I use lard for pie crust, too, but I didn't notice a problem with my peach cobblers held over, especially when heated slightly.

My mom uses butter--might that hold over better?  Might be worth a try.
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Offline healthybratt

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Re: Cooking with Lard: Is it healthy?
« Reply #12 on: March 10, 2008, 03:35:44 PM »

I have tried butter also but, just like the lard, the crust doesn't stay flaky the next day. :(

Texture is very important to my pie-eating husband. :-*

Maybe I'll just have to make a bunch of dough, rolled out and ready.  Then, I could assemble a pie in minutes and bake it fresh.  Heck, even my 9 year old could do that. ;)
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Offline diaperswyper

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Re: Cooking with Lard: Is it healthy?
« Reply #13 on: March 10, 2008, 03:41:03 PM »
We tried lard last night in our fryer to make french fries and the smell was pretty intense.  Our whole house smelled like lard.   Is all lard like that or is it just the kind I found.  (We found it a a local meat locker and it is pure, nothing added)   Also, I wondered what it would taste like in a pie crust.  I've heard that lard makes the best pie crust, but would it have a faint taste of bacon???  I know I could try it but I hate to ruin a whole pie. . .   Any thoughts? -KG
  We had lard from friends who raised very good quality pork, just for their family and we loved it. My dh then bought "pure" lard from the grocery store and when we fried with it i had to hold my breath because it smelled so strongly like pig. Ewwwww!!!!!!!!! I think it makes a big difference where and how the pig is raised.

Offline skelliott2

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Re: Cooking with Lard: Is it healthy?
« Reply #14 on: March 10, 2008, 04:04:15 PM »
go to your local meat locker and buy it and they charge like 10 cents a pound.But you have to render it yourself...Worth it.Just get a 1/2 a pot full at a time.I have done this to make soap.Kidney suet is the cleanest fat but DH is at work I do not know if it is beef or pork... :-\

Em

How do you render lard??  I bought  a pack one time, but didn't know what to do with it!   :-[ :-\

Anyone??  Thanks!

Offline Roehrmomma

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Re: Cooking with Lard: Is it healthy?
« Reply #15 on: March 10, 2008, 04:09:59 PM »
you cook it down and strain it
it is stinky  ;D
« Last Edit: March 10, 2008, 04:12:59 PM by Roehrmomma »

Offline Mrs. Davis

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Re: Cooking with Lard: Is it healthy?
« Reply #16 on: March 11, 2008, 02:54:48 AM »
Sorry....just can't do it. :-\  I know my grandmothers use to cook with lard, but somehow....it just doesn't seem right.  I guess I think back to Old Testament where we are told not to eat pork, that it is unclean.  I know the N.T. changed that, but I still believe there are reasons that it is unclean.  And, don't animals store the toxins in their fat?

Offline Roehrmomma

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Re: Cooking with Lard: Is it healthy?
« Reply #17 on: March 11, 2008, 02:59:11 AM »
Sorry....just can't do it. :-\  ....  And, don't animals store the toxins in their fat?

 People do. I am sure they do to.  We do not buy pork but will eat it and enjoy it when we are served it. Unless the fat content is high then I feel sick. :-X

I only used lard for soap.Not for eating. Never have. I'd like to keep it that way. ;)

Emily

Offline BJ_BOBBI_JO

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Re: Cooking with Lard: Is it healthy?
« Reply #18 on: March 11, 2008, 07:17:15 AM »
I have to admit that popcorn poped up in lard is wonderful. Addictive. From the way I understand it fats carry with them the ability to transport an ultra good smell in our hungry nostrils making us want to pig out on them. How diabolical of fats. LOL. ::)

This is what I was told/read/learned  concerning using lard:

-fat is what the body did not want or need so it made that food into fat cells and stored it on the body. The stuff the body does not want is often unhealthy toxins and other bad stuff the body don't care for. It all gets stored there all yucky like in the fat cells.
So when people eat fat from animals ( lard, etc) they are ingesting the toxins and other bad stuff that animal ingested. I have often wondered if thats why the Bible said ( in the OT) to not eat fat? For our own good maybe? I dont know. But either way the thought sickenens me.

 I admit I miss foods fried up in lard because I was  raised that way. But it really messed up my digestive system as it has my parents and some of my siblings. My parents still use lard and their bowels keep getting worse and worse but they refuse to stop because that is just how it was done back when they was being raised. Whenever me or some of my siblings eat some of my moms food ( the food that she used lard with)  we go home with diarrhea and other troubles because our bowels are no longer used to eating toxic fat.

It seems so yucky to think of myself eating the parts of an animal that the animals body did not want anymore because it had no value and was bad for it. So if it was bad for the animal I would assume it could very well be bad for me as well. Double yuck. Just the thought  is yucky. I mise well go out and chew on a slab of fat ripped right off an animal, no difference.

But oh the wonderful taste cooking with lard makes in foods. It just ain't fair!  :'( :D ::)
« Last Edit: March 11, 2008, 07:19:54 AM by BJ_BOBBI_JO »

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Re: Cooking with Lard: Is it healthy?
« Reply #19 on: March 11, 2008, 08:41:41 AM »
Read this link--it covers one perspective of fat in the OT...kind of a controversial article, though...be warned...http://www.biblelife.org/biblediet.htm

Offline Gigi

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Re: Cooking with Lard: Is it healthy?
« Reply #20 on: March 11, 2008, 08:55:59 AM »
I have to admit that popcorn poped up in lard is wonderful. Addictive. From the way I understand it fats carry with them the ability to transport an ultra good smell in our hungry nostrils making us want to pig out on them. How diabolical of fats. LOL. ::)


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Offline FindingMe

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Re: Cooking with Lard: Is it healthy?
« Reply #21 on: May 21, 2008, 08:29:27 AM »

This may have already been covered on a different thread, but I wanted to post a link that I thought would be valuable to those considering lard, or wanting to make their own lard. I haven't tried it myself, but it looks fairly do-able.  :) The instructions were fairly straight-forward and simple, and I thought the whole post was rather an interesting read.

http://homesicktexan.blogspot.com/2008/05/how-to-render-lard.html

« Last Edit: May 21, 2008, 08:32:42 AM by FindingMe »

Offline boysmama

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Re: Cooking with Lard: Is it healthy?
« Reply #22 on: August 21, 2008, 10:24:35 AM »

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Offline BJ_BOBBI_JO

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Re: Cooking with Lard: Is it healthy?
« Reply #24 on: August 21, 2008, 03:23:15 PM »
Well to find lard the old fashion way you simply just save the junk left over in the pan after frying pork or beef. Ya know the fat that drips off the frying meat and then solidifies after sitting in the cold pan for a while. That is lard.

You can pour the hot grease (lard) into porcelain or cast iron containers to store. Other wise you have to let it cool and then scoop it into other containers. Then you use it in place of oil and sometimes butter.

I cant remember why but it is important to NOT mix pork and beef lard together.

My mom was raised on lard sandwiches. That is what poor folks with big families did back then. They ate as many parts of their butchered aimals as they could including the fat. YUCK a lard sandwich sounds so unappealing. They mise well as named it "fat roll" sandwhich.

"ill take a slab of solidified fat cells on my sandwhich please. Oh and make sure the animal, has recently eaten plants sprayed with pesticides so that it is stored in the animals fat so i can have a fat cell pesticide sandwhich please" 

 EWWW no wonder my moms cholesterol and  health is so bad.
« Last Edit: August 21, 2008, 03:26:10 PM by BJ_BOBBI_JO »

Offline naturalgirl

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Re: Cooking with Lard: Is it healthy?
« Reply #25 on: August 24, 2008, 02:56:25 AM »
Doing some study on lard makes one wish for the old days...   


    Found this webpage talking about lard. No scientific research about it health-wise though, at least not much. But it is intresting and talks about this guy's personal experience with lard cooking:

http://www.foodandwine.com/articles/lard-the-new-health-food

An exerpt from this scource says...

"...lard retains many good properties as it is a completely natural and unrefined product it can also be classed as an "antibacterial" product so can in fact be very good for the body by helping to combat disease. Experts have also found that lard can actually help reduce body fat as it contains linoleic acids (CLA's) The fatty acids found in lard also play an important role in promoting growth and maintaining a healthy metabolism."

http://www.hub-uk.com/interesting02/spanish-lard.htm

And an eye-opening quote from an article published by the familiar Weston Price Foundation:

 "While the Germans may have a new-found appreciation for lard--or secretly kept it all along--other cultures are battling with their stance on the fat. For example, a recent article in The New York Times featured a Mexican woman who opened a restaurant in Oaxaca and then bemoaned the fact that the locals were boycotting her establishment because she had substituted canola oil for lard in all her dishes. I side with the locals. Lard, although commonly misidentified as a saturated fat, should really be classified as a monounsaturated fat. According to Mary Enig, author of Know Your Fats, lard is about 40 percent saturated, 50 percent monounsaturated, and contains 10 percent polyunsaturated fatty acids. It is also one of our richest dietary sources of vitamin D.

Obviously, lard is making a comeback from its nadir after years of vilification by big food corporations eager to push their plastic substitutes (see "The Rise and Fall of Crisco," Wise Traditions, Summer 2001).

As for me, I make a sport out of hunting down good sources of lard. Since most of the lard sold in grocery stores (if you are lucky enough to find it at all) contains preservatives like BHT added to prolong its shelf life, I look for farmers who sell what they can't use. Sometimes local butchers carry additive-free lard, or can order it for you."

http://www.westonaprice.org/motherlinda/lard.html

   I personally have been using lard from the local store because 1. it is refrigerated 2. because I personally have seen it being made (seen that nothing is added) and 3. I know that the hogs are mostly from this state.

  It isn't the absolute best, but it is the best for what we can find right now, and I am so glad to be able to use it instead of vegtable shortning or canola oil.   :)

P.S... I am not fat, by the way, lol. Do too much running around for that  :D ;)
« Last Edit: August 24, 2008, 03:40:39 AM by naturalgirl »

Offline stebs7

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Re: Cooking with Lard: Is it healthy?
« Reply #26 on: December 23, 2008, 02:18:26 PM »
Lard or Beef Tallow:

My cousin who has lived on a farm all of his life - is about 45 years old - and since this is Poland - he knows stuff that mostly our great grandparents or further back in the U.S. might know.  Why?  When I moved here in 1990, it was about 30 years behind the times here.  I felt like I could see my childhood with adult eyes.

Anyway, I write this because he shared some very interesting info with me.  I always find out something new from him.  He said that after eating something made with lard - but especially with beef tallow, you have to drink something hot - not cold.  Why?  Because the lard/beef tallow will harden and plug up your arteries, etc.

Its common sense when you think about it because when we make our lard or tallow, it is nice and runny while warm but as it cools it thickens and hardens - can you imagine that happening inside of us? :( 

Americans (I am an American by the way - though my dad was Polish and my mom is English - with her accent,still :) tend to drink cold drinks with meals.  Europeans (and others) drink hot drinks (normally - except those that took on the western habits) with their meals ( or warm beer- room temperature - like in Germany).  Hot drinks would flush the fats down (I bet beer does too :)

He told us that one day after frying french fries - he said eat them while they are hot - don't let them get cold (because of the tallow).

Interesting?  I thought it was - and love having a live cousin to teach me the things of the past!  He is a great cook - and is a great help - if I have to run out - he has the dishes down and the floor washed before I say jump!  God has blessed us thru him.

Blessings and a Merry Christmas to you all.  Nancy in Poland

Offline healthyinOhio

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Re: Cooking with Lard: Is it healthy?
« Reply #27 on: December 23, 2008, 02:28:04 PM »
I read in the book: The Good Fat Cookbook that when lard is used, it has the same properties as olive oil.  It is a monounsaturated fat that does not absorb the fat into the food it is cooking, unlike other unhealthy oils that are high in omega 6's like sunflower, safflower, soy, and canola. 

Offline BJ_BOBBI_JO

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Re: Cooking with Lard: Is it healthy?
« Reply #28 on: December 23, 2008, 05:10:30 PM »
Wow Stebs7 that was interresting. When I worked at a nursing home there was an old lady there who insisted upon drinking hot water with each meal for health reasons. She said back in her day a lot of people did that. But I had never heard of the lard and hot water connection before. Thank you for sharing that.

Offline brightspot

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Re: Cooking with Lard: Is it healthy?
« Reply #29 on: December 24, 2008, 05:49:35 PM »
Wow Stebs7 that was interresting. When I worked at a nursing home there was an old lady there who insisted upon drinking hot water with each meal for health reasons. She said back in her day a lot of people did that. But I had never heard of the lard and hot water connection before. Thank you for sharing that.

My Father and Mother-in-law always had a kettle of warm water on the back of the stove to drink after each meal. They too said it was for health reasons. My husband does the same thing, especially after breakfast but sometimes after other meals too. Said it seems to help him. I've never tried it but it is interesting that there should really be a connection. It seems that your body temperature would be warm enough to keep it from getting hard?