Author Topic: Anyone for Korean?  (Read 43637 times)

Offline healthybratt

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Anyone for Korean?
« on: March 27, 2006, 04:12:14 PM »
I married a half Korean man and for the last 10 years, his mother has been teaching me how to cook for him.  It's a very slow process, as she doesn't measure anything, but here are the recipes I've almost mastered written in actual measurements.

Enjoy.  We sure so. 

NOTE:  Many of these recipes are very healthy.  They contain lots of fresh garlic, onions, ginger and red peppers, all of which are good immune system builders.  We don't get sick very often around here.  My kids maybe get one cold a year while all the neighborhood kids are running around with runny noses.

If you want to see some pics check THIS LINK

Traditional Kimchee
Large bowl with sealable lid
1 gallon jar
3 small – medium heads Nappa (Chinese) Cabbage (5 lbs)
5-10 chopped scallions
sea salt (table salt may be substituted)
1/2 cup of ground red pepper
3 Tablespoons minced garlic
½ - 1 tablespoon sugar
1 tablespoon kimchee sauce (also called fish sauce) optional
½ tablespoon minced ginger root (very strong flavor – may want to leave out)
surgical type gloves to protect hands from hot pepper (spoon may be used)

Cut cabbage into 1-2 inch squares.  Spread a layer in large bowl and sprinkle with sea salt.  Continue layers of cabbage and salt until all cabbage is in bowl.  Put lid on bowl and let cure for about 10-15 minutes until cabbage is limp and will not snap when you try to break it in two (about 2-3 hours).  Flip bowl over and let cure for another 10-15 minutes.  With larger batches, may just mix cabbage and salt well and cure for 20-30 minutes. Rinse 3-4 times thoroughly and drain DO NOT SQUEEZE.  Salt again to taste.  Add all other ingredients and mix with gloved hand.  Add hot pepper a little at a time until desired hot (I've practiced with this and we like 1/2 cup but you might like a little less.  If you don't add enough, when the cabbage sours, "sour" is all you will taste). (light orange color).  Put in jar and refrigerate.  Kimchee will taste best after 1-2 days in frige to cure.  Cabbage Kimchee can be stored and eaten for several weeks even after soured.  Beware of the smell.  If it's gotten too sour to tolerate, cook it with some meat.  Makes the meat taste good and no waste.  ;D  We like it in chicken.



Cucumber Kimchee

6 small cucs peeled and sliced (keep seeds)
8 scallions chopped
sea salt (may substitute table salt)
6 cloves minced garlic
1 tablespoon korean hot sauce (bean paste)** - may substitute smaller amount ground red pepper
1 tablespoon vinegar
roasted sesame seeds
surgical type gloves to protect hands from hot pepper (may use spoon, but hands work best)

sprinkle cucumber slices with salt and mix thoroughly.  Let stand until cucumbers are limp and will not snap when you try to break it in two..  Rinse, sqeeze, drain, repeat.  Mix in all other ingredients with gloved hand thoroughly.  If using hot pepper instead of paste add 1/2 teaspoon at a time until kimchee reaches desired hot (light orange color).  Refrigerate and serve.



Bulgogi (Korean Steak)

Also called Pulgogi

All ingredients are approximate

4 lbs Beef (usually roast) sliced thinly
¼ - ¾ cup soy sauce  (careful it's salty)
roasted sesame seeds
3 cloves minced garlic
6-10 chopped green onions (whole)
approx ¼ cup olive oil (or other cooking oil) – you may substitute sesame oil and leave out the sesame seeds if desired.
1 teaspoon sugar
black pepper

Marinate overnight in smallest bowl possible.  Cook in sauce pan, fry pan, broiler or grill until brown.  Serve with rice and Kimchee.



Hot Pork

2-3 lbs pork loin roast (or any pork chop) sliced to bitesize with bone and fat removed
1 tsp sugar
black pepper
6-10 chopped scallion onions
3 cloves minced garlic
heaping tbsp korean hot sauce (hot bean paste)**

Mix thoroughly (may marinate overnight if desired).  Simmer in fry or sauce pan until pork is cooked and tender (about 1/2 hour).  Serve with rice.


**Here's what Korean Hot Bean Paste generally looks like from the Asian Market.

http://www.goldencountry.com/korea.aspx

Go to this website and look at items# J086005 & J086023
« Last Edit: January 23, 2008, 02:12:55 PM by healthybratt »
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Offline StephTallent

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Re: Anyone for Korean?
« Reply #1 on: March 27, 2006, 07:04:32 PM »
Wow.  These look AMAZING!  ;D Can't wait to try some <especially the spicy ones> on my hubby!  Thanks so much for posting. 
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Offline Charis

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Re: Anyone for Korean?
« Reply #2 on: April 13, 2006, 09:27:12 PM »
Do you have any good eggroll/springroll recipes? I love to make them but still perfecting my recipe.
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Offline healthybratt

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Re: Anyone for Korean?
« Reply #3 on: April 14, 2006, 04:58:04 AM »
Do you have any good eggroll/springroll recipes? I love to make them but still perfecting my recipe.

I just use ground pork.  I fry it in water to reduce as much fat as possible and then drain.  I mix the pork with chopped cabbage, onions and garlic.  I just usually throw stuff in and go,
but 

I think maybe

2 lbs of pork and a head of cabbage maybe?  Sometimes, if I'm feeling lazy, I just buy a couple of bags of coleslaw mix from the produce dept.  I don't have any recipes.  I just kind of made this up.  Something that makes dipping exceptionally yummy tho, is about 1/2 soy sauce and 1/2 white vinegar (play with this, you don't want it too sour or too salty) and then add toasted sesame seeds (about enough to float on top - it really adds flavor to the mix.)  We use this as a dip for Mondu too (don't know how to make it yet).

My Vietnamese friends use vermicelli instead of cabbage and one of them uses jicima.  Their eggrolls were greedily sought after by coworkers at my last job outside the home.
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Offline Julia

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Re: Anyone for Korean?
« Reply #4 on: November 14, 2006, 04:04:19 PM »
Hey Healthybratt, I tried some kimchee! There's a Korean church that meets in our church building and they always have a big meal afterward and we were invited the other day. I realized - that's the stuff that stinks so bad! People actually have come into the church office reporting that they think something has died near the kitchen. Anyway, I wouldn't have eaten it if you hadn't been telling us how healthy it is. I feel healthier already  ;)!

Offline healthybratt

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Re: Anyone for Korean?
« Reply #5 on: November 14, 2006, 04:52:50 PM »
It's stinky alright.  We have a stinky kitty and her name is "Kimchee".  LOL   ::)
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Offline ShabbyChic

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Re: Anyone for Korean?
« Reply #6 on: November 14, 2006, 05:55:56 PM »
In college we had 2 Korean girls who'd cook Kimchee and it was SO stinky and SO tasty.  But I think you have to be Korean to cook it correctly.  And I think you have to be a grandma to make good fried chicken or biscuits  ;D
That's Shabby SHEIK not Shabby CHICK.  Hee-hee.

Offline KatieMac

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Re: Anyone for Korean?
« Reply #7 on: November 14, 2006, 06:59:39 PM »
Thank you so much for posting this!!

Offline healthybratt

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Re: Anyone for Korean?
« Reply #8 on: November 14, 2006, 07:36:47 PM »
In college we had 2 Korean girls who'd cook Kimchee and it was SO stinky and SO tasty.  But I think you have to be Korean to cook it correctly.  And I think you have to be a grandma to make good fried chicken or biscuits  ;D
I'm not Korean and I make a darn good Kimchee.  ;)  BTW, it's not cooked.  ;D
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Offline grc

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Re: Anyone for Korean?
« Reply #9 on: November 15, 2006, 01:33:54 AM »
we love Bulgogi, I have that same recipe and make it a couple times a year.  My husband spent a year in Korea and raved about it for years when we got the recipe he was ecstatic. 
I'll have to try the kimchee thanks.

Gina

Offline sunflower

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Re: Anyone for Korean?
« Reply #10 on: November 19, 2006, 07:54:51 PM »
I am also married to a Korean man.  I also try to cook tasty Korean food for him.  I do understand the non measuring mother in laws.  My mother in law told me to put a cup of sugar in this meat marinate.....it was a coffee cup.  I think things are just past down that they are so use to cooking bulgogi day after day that just by looking at it they know if it is right.  It impresses me. 

Try this soup:
Duck Soup (without any real duck meat)/Mandu Soup
Bring to a Boil:
      beef broth
      5/6 pieces of bulgogi meat
      1/3 bag of flat ovalets rice noddle (which is the duck)
      mandu (pot stickers)

Soup Sauce
     soy sauce
     garlic
     green onion
     red bean paste (go che chung)- very spicy
     sugar

Have each person put the amount of soup sauce in their own soup for favor.  We also add rice to all our Korean soups.
Let me know if you like it!  I love most Korean soups.  They are very brothy.

Offline healthybratt

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Re: Anyone for Korean?
« Reply #11 on: November 19, 2006, 09:16:39 PM »
I am also married to a Korean man.  I also try to cook tasty Korean food for him.
Any idea how to make the long round rice cakes from scratch?  They look like string cheese.  Hubby likes these cooked with hot bean paste, onions, garlic and sesame seeds/oil.  MIL brings us some from Chicago every now and again, but I'd love to figure out how to make them from scratch.  I've searched high and low on Google, but all I can find is the recipes which include them, but nothing on how to make them. 
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Offline sunflower

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Re: Anyone for Korean?
« Reply #12 on: November 20, 2006, 09:05:35 AM »
I will ask around and see if I can get you any help.  Thanks

Offline SC

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Re: Anyone for Korean?
« Reply #13 on: November 20, 2006, 10:21:03 AM »
HB is this what you are looking for? It describes the process without really getting into measurements.
http://www.answers.com/topic/mochi-1
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Offline healthybratt

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Re: Anyone for Korean?
« Reply #14 on: November 20, 2006, 11:42:38 AM »
HB is this what you are looking for? It describes the process without really getting into measurements.
http://www.answers.com/topic/mochi-1
I don't think this is it, but I'm not sure.

Look at these.
http://english.tour2korea.com/05food/LocalFood/su_09.asp?kosm=m5_3&konum=2
http://www.clickasia.co.kr/about/h0101t.htm
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Offline SC

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Re: Anyone for Korean?
« Reply #15 on: November 20, 2006, 01:53:41 PM »
HB is this what you are looking for? It describes the process without really getting into measurements.
http://www.answers.com/topic/mochi-1
I don't think this is it, but I'm not sure.

Look at these.
http://english.tour2korea.com/05food/LocalFood/su_09.asp?kosm=m5_3&konum=2
http://www.clickasia.co.kr/about/h0101t.htm

I think it IS the same thing. If so, it seems that the process involves pounding cooked rice into a paste and shaping it under pressure. Sounds like it's time to break out the lab coat again.
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Offline healthybratt

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Re: Anyone for Korean?
« Reply #16 on: November 20, 2006, 02:08:22 PM »
HB is this what you are looking for? It describes the process without really getting into measurements.
http://www.answers.com/topic/mochi-1
I don't think this is it, but I'm not sure.

Look at these.
http://english.tour2korea.com/05food/LocalFood/su_09.asp?kosm=m5_3&konum=2
http://www.clickasia.co.kr/about/h0101t.htm

I think it IS the same thing. If so, it seems that the process involves pounding cooked rice into a paste and shaping it under pressure. Sounds like it's time to break out the lab coat again.
I have rice flour.  I figured that's how they were made.  Hmmmmm...I have to cook some sticky rice (I have that too) and then pound on it ???  Food processor?  I've tried that before for baby food and it just breaks it into smaller pieces, but no paste.  When I get ambitious, I may just try it with the flour.  I've made deep fried rice cakes this way with powdered sugar.....unhealthy and yummy.  ;)
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Offline healthybratt

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Re: Anyone for Korean?
« Reply #17 on: November 20, 2006, 02:11:09 PM »
PS  Thanks SC.  You're still my hero (ine)  ;D
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Offline healthybratt

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Re: Anyone for Korean?
« Reply #18 on: November 20, 2006, 02:26:29 PM »
PS  Thanks SC.  You're still my hero (ine)  ;D
I found some recipes for Mochi.  They call for glutinous rice flour - yipppeeee!  I have some of this in my freezer.  Although, it calls for potato starch too.  I'll have to pick some of this up, I suppose.   :-\
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Offline sunflower

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Re: Anyone for Korean?
« Reply #19 on: November 20, 2006, 04:45:14 PM »
HB,
That is what I am calling duck.  Those rice noddles is what you use in the soup.  It gives me somemore of what you are looking for.  I can ask our great grandmother over the holidays and get back to you.   :)

Offline sunflower

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Re: Anyone for Korean?
« Reply #20 on: November 20, 2006, 05:07:35 PM »
HB,
HI once more.  My sister in law (which is Korean) thinks that you sound not try and make the long chesse stick thing, but you can buy them and then make your hot bean paste concoction.  She is going to send me a recipe tomorrow.  I will forward it to you when I get it.  Hope this helps.

Offline healthybratt

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Re: Anyone for Korean?
« Reply #21 on: November 20, 2006, 05:56:39 PM »
HB,
HI once more.  My sister in law (which is Korean) thinks that you sound not try and make the long chesse stick thing, but you can buy them and then make your hot bean paste concoction.  She is going to send me a recipe tomorrow.  I will forward it to you when I get it.  Hope this helps.
My MIL says the same thing, but my MIL thinks I'm too dumb to can tomatoes  ::) , so that doesn't mean much.  ;D

The bean recipe would be great, but I don't really make those much.  Hubby likes the cakes fried with hot bean paste.  He eats the sweet ones too, but not as often.

Tonight,  I just made sweet rice dough (too much talking about rice flour) and fried it up and sugared it.  mmmmmmmm..... :o

Thanks.
« Last Edit: November 20, 2006, 05:59:00 PM by healthybratt »
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Offline healthybratt

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Re: Anyone for Korean?
« Reply #22 on: January 22, 2007, 07:08:53 AM »
I forgot, I had posted some pics of bulgogi and hot pork on my blog.  Here's the link if you're interested.

Xanga/zippyboot
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Offline boysmama

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Re: Anyone for Korean?
« Reply #23 on: January 29, 2007, 10:00:24 AM »
Well we did it!  ;D I made a batch of kimchee (w/ less hot pepper ;)). It was ready to serve today so I made some venison steaks seasoned w/ ginger and soy sauce, sweet-n-sour green beans and rice, and of course, kimchee. DH is not a big cabbage fan so I had my fingers crossed  ;) . His comment was that it was one of my best dinners :o ... He loves rice and that green bean recipe but has them frequently so it was the kimchee that made an impression! I had used a little purple cabbage and my boys were so tickled to eat flowers  :D So... big hit... Thanks HB. I can now use cabbage and have a new string of 'rice lunches' to try out 8) Good thing 'cause my pinto beans are getting low ;)

Offline healthybratt

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Re: Anyone for Korean?
« Reply #24 on: January 29, 2007, 11:03:20 AM »
Well we did it!  ;D I made a batch of kimchee (w/ less hot pepper ;)). It was ready to serve today so I made some venison steaks seasoned w/ ginger and soy sauce, sweet-n-sour green beans and rice, and of course, kimchee. DH is not a big cabbage fan so I had my fingers crossed  ;) . His comment was that it was one of my best dinners :o ... He loves rice and that green bean recipe but has them frequently so it was the kimchee that made an impression! I had used a little purple cabbage and my boys were so tickled to eat flowers  :D So... big hit... Thanks HB. I can now use cabbage and have a new string of 'rice lunches' to try out 8) Good thing 'cause my pinto beans are getting low ;)
You used regular cabbage?  Just curious.  MIL and I have never tried this.  (Well she might have, but didn't tell me.  ;))
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Re: Anyone for Korean?
« Reply #25 on: January 29, 2007, 11:17:40 AM »
HB, you think for the Korean Steak, I could use stew meat?  :-\
I am printing out these as we speak, er, um, I mean type.

Offline healthybratt

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Re: Anyone for Korean?
« Reply #26 on: January 29, 2007, 11:22:26 AM »
HB, you think for the Korean Steak, I could use stew meat?  :-\
I am printing out these as we speak, er, um, I mean type.
This recipe is designed for the cheap cuts of meat.  I think stew meat qualifies.  I like the roast because if it's cut across the grain, it can actually turn out pretty tender, but we use it for beef ribs, round steak or whatever you can find.  Sometimes it will turn out pretty chewy, but it still tastes good.
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Nickole

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Re: Anyone for Korean?
« Reply #27 on: January 29, 2007, 11:30:49 AM »
Great b/c we just happen to have a ton of stew meat in the freezer!  :)

Offline boysmama

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Re: Anyone for Korean?
« Reply #28 on: January 30, 2007, 06:17:41 AM »
You used regular cabbage?  Just curious.  MIL and I have never tried this.  (Well she might have, but didn't tell me.  ;))
Yes, I did. I was looking at some prepared stuff in the store. The ing. just said cabbage and it looked like regular and red cabbage  ???. I had reg. cabbage on hand so when I looked at the price of Chinese cabbage I decided to try this first ;)
I'd like to try the authentic version next  ;D . I know I like the chinese cabbage better for eating raw w/ peanut butter :-*
« Last Edit: March 07, 2010, 08:53:24 AM by healthybratt »

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Re: Anyone for Korean?
« Reply #29 on: February 01, 2007, 07:28:52 AM »
I have some Target brand ground red pepper here which I thought was the same as cayenne, no???  So this is what I am to use 1/2 cup of???