Author Topic: Nourishing Traditions  (Read 122794 times)

Offline healthybratt

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Nourishing Traditions
« on: May 17, 2006, 10:43:34 AM »
I have not read this book yet, but it's been mentioned many times in other posts.  I would ask that those of you who have read this book post your thoughts, remarks and recommendations in this thread for easy access. 

Thanks

hb  ;D
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Offline dara

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Re: Nourishing Traditions
« Reply #1 on: May 17, 2006, 10:57:12 AM »
I like it. Good recipes, though we don't eat nearly the amount of fat the book recomends- I don't put 4 T. of butter on any one serving of food! I would gain weight like there was no tomorrow! I like the pure food thrust, though, and need to read more about soaking grains...
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Offline blessedby5

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Re: Nourishing Traditions
« Reply #2 on: May 17, 2006, 11:13:31 AM »
I really like this book.  More for the info than the recipes.  Lots of good reading.  I read parts to my mom about how eating fat doesn't make you fat and she's not convinced, yet.  I put lots of butter on everything and use whole milk and eat homemade ice cream sweetened with maple syrup and whole milk yogurt, etc :.  I don't think it's the natural fats that put the weight on us but all the other junk we eat.  I suppose it's hard to believe something when you've heard the exact opposite for so long. :)
I will sing unto the Lord, because he hath dealt bountifully with me.  Psalm 13:6

Offline FaithAcre

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Re: Nourishing Traditions
« Reply #3 on: May 17, 2006, 05:51:29 PM »
One of my most favorite books in the kitchen!  I have to agree with blessedby5, it's not the healthy (read natural) fats that make you fat.  I read another book by Sally Fallon called Eat Fat, Lose Fat.  Eye opening!   We are just so very decieved by our FDA's recommendations, that its hard for any of us to have our minds changed.  I urge you to go to weston price foundation's website and do a bit of research there. 

Oh, back to the book...I have only owned mine for a few short months and of those few months, I was reading the plethora of information in it!  Just recently have I started utilizing the recipes and am loving it! 

The recipes require planning time.  This isn't a problem for me, because my menu is usually planned out and I look at it in the evening to see what needs to be done for tomorrow.  Some might have difficulties with this, but I think it's a good habit to form!

Hope this was helpful somewhat!

~Tara~
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Offline organimommi

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Re: Nourishing Traditions
« Reply #4 on: May 17, 2006, 06:48:12 PM »
I also just started reading this book a few months ago.  Love it!  Lots of great info. We were already eating lots of organic foods exspecially diary, but i have really learned so much from this book in respect to meats and fermented foods.  No more Low Fat Yogurt for me!  I recommend this book to everyone.

Offline lotsaboys

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Re: Nourishing Traditions
« Reply #5 on: May 18, 2006, 06:38:21 AM »
Thanks, healthybratt, for starting this subject! I was planning to, just had not got around to it yet. Oh, where do I start?!  :) At the time a friend told us about Nourishing Traditions, it was just what we were needing and ready for! We have loved the changes it brought to our eating and we always say it has done for our health what the Bible teachings from Michael Pearl did for our souls!  :)

When I first read it, I wanted to dive in and cook up a storm, but soon found out it is best to take it slowly at first. It requires alot of planning ahead because of the soaking, fermenting and simmering, but well worth it. Our family has made gradual changes starting with basics like sweeteners, salt, and raw milk and yogurt, and now we've done the Kombucha tea, beet kvass, sourdough starter from rye, cream cheese and whey, sour cream, ginger beer and small beer, beef and chicken stock, homemade ice cream, eggyolks for my baby, and much more!

My boys tease me about my tattered book and all the bookmarks and scribbles. It has been such a learning process for me, but so well worth it! My dear hubby loves doing all the fermenting and culturing, so he is a big reason for our success.

Its amazing how deceived we've been by most nutritional experts out there, esp. the ones promoting low fat. Its been refreshing to get back to traditions that are nourishing! :D

We still have some areas that we are trying to learn more about and decide what is the best route to take, like cheese for instance. Our family eats alot of cheese and Sally doesn't recommend it except for raw cheese which gets very pricey for a family of ten. I've welcome any help on that. (the cheese, not the 10 problem  ::)!!!, we ARE trying to slow down !!! :-[)

Oh, and I also found the "Limited-time, limited-budget guidelines" section in the back very helpful. Also the may Sources she lists. Well, I don't want this to get too long and boring, so I'll quit, but am looking forward to hearing from others! ~B


Offline Chickory Chick

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Re: Nourishing Traditions
« Reply #6 on: July 11, 2006, 09:06:21 PM »
How did I miss this post! Thanks for the cross reference HB.  I love this book.  I keep it with my health reference books instead of my cookbooks (because I kept taking it to bed or wherever to read), thankfully that bookshelf is right next to my kitchen entry way, so I can grab it when I want to try a recipe.

 I first discovered this book when I read "The Maker's Diet" and Dr. Mercola's book.  I noticed both had recipes from Nourishing Traditions, so I decided to go straight for the source.   Amazon had it for $17 (which was the cheapest I found it, but at the time thought it was pricey) and if I ordered $8 more (easily done) shipping is FREE!  I was not expecting such a huge book, (the size of a large town phone book) nor the reference part of it.  Definitely worth the money.   It has so much information and recipes. Beside the meaty introductions to each chapter, the margins are full of quotes, research and a "guess what store bought food has these ingredients" challenges.  IT has a great resource section in the back and a comprehensive index.  I showed it to my mom and sis in KY and they each ordered a copy.   Definitely a great resource and its nice because you can just pick it up and start reading a little bit here and a little bit there.
Chickory Chick fka Kayinpa http://kayinpa.blogspot.com/

Offline Hope64

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Re: Nourishing Traditions
« Reply #7 on: July 14, 2006, 05:01:40 PM »
Check www.overstock.com   I found it cheaper there.  I "think" it was about $14.00 with actual book rate shipping.  It's been a few weeks since I checked the price though.

Hope64

Nope.  I don't own it yet.  It's at the top of my "I'd like to buy it" list.  I have Maker's Diet book though. 

Offline Elizab04

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Re: Nourishing Traditions
« Reply #8 on: July 14, 2006, 05:40:40 PM »
I really found this book eye opening.  She explains everything very well.  I had to wait for 4 other people before I could get it at the library.  When I finally got it and wanted to renew it, I couldn't, because 4 more people were waiting for it!  I'm just going to buy it.  It's worth it.

Offline felmleyfam

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Re: Nourishing Traditions
« Reply #9 on: July 14, 2006, 06:33:15 PM »
It is good for even the mostly vegetarian eaters. The grains section is small but the info on soaking grains has been helpful for me (the banana bread is good).
happy wife & momma ! When people say, "you have your hands full," I say, "and my heart!!!" It changes their negative attitude into a positive one in a few seconds flat

Offline Julie G

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Re: Nourishing Traditions
« Reply #10 on: July 15, 2006, 03:39:54 AM »
I also checked it out from the library, would love to own it.  There is so much information and it is very simply put, so you can actually understand it without needing a brain transplant ;).  When I was reading it, I was so excited I kept telling my husband..."Listen to this.....Can you believe that?"  He was pretty amused by the whole thing.  Some great information, wish I would have tried the recipes....I had to return the book as well so I didn't get that far.
Ellie:  (when she was 3 years old)  "Mama, you sure got a big butt to sit with!"


Offline DawnsEarlyBirds

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Re: Nourishing Traditions
« Reply #11 on: July 15, 2006, 09:37:57 AM »
My son and new daughter-in-law spent their first 8 months of marriage in the Dominican Republic.  Some folks were going down for a short term mission trip and I sent down the Nourishing Traditions recipe for soaking beans and a few bottles of organic lemon juice for them.  My D-I-L said that she was now soaking the many many beans they were eating and that it made a huge difference in how my son's digestive system was handling the beans, and then she said, "And I am THANKFUL!"   ;D ;D ;D ;D

I love the book, followed a lot of it this past year, and we had a much much healthier winter.  We are just doing the fermented vegetables, soaking beans and grains, drying nuts, so far.  Haven't quite been able to think about the raw meats and organs yet .........

Offline ARmom

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Re: Nourishing Traditions
« Reply #12 on: July 15, 2006, 02:09:27 PM »
I didn't read this thread very throughly, and may have missed it, but I didn't catch the author's name. Could someone give me that info please?  Thanks so much.
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Offline Chickory Chick

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Re: Nourishing Traditions
« Reply #13 on: July 15, 2006, 04:54:47 PM »
I didn't read this thread very throughly, and may have missed it, but I didn't catch the author's name. Could someone give me that info please?  Thanks so much.

Sally Fallon
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Offline healthyinOhio

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Re: Nourishing Traditions
« Reply #14 on: July 21, 2006, 12:41:49 PM »
I just got my copy of this book in the mail, yesterday.  I already have around 600+ pages read.    I really really love it and would recommend it to anyone who is interested in good traditional cooking.  I have already been able to answer a lot of my dumb lacto-fermented questions.  Like you don't necessarliy get whey out of a newly opened yogurt container.  You actually strain it and the stuff that drips is whey and the rest I guess is cheese.  Duh!  Hey, I am learning!
You can make pickled cucumbers so much easier than using vinegar, salt, and canning.  And it is really healthy and supports your intestinal bacteria. 
I am enjoying all the history on foods.  I just love to study different cultures.  I found the section on baby food very interesting.  Feeding egg yolk and raw liver to a four month old :o  I would have never thought that one on my own!  I would highly recommend this book for those who have a lot of time for some of the rigorous preparation of soakings and fermentings. 

Offline healthyinOhio

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Re: Nourishing Traditions
« Reply #15 on: July 21, 2006, 03:57:00 PM »
Just made my second lacto-fermented veggie and my first sauerkraut.  I pounded for 10 min. and again, I did not have the juice above my veggies.  Do I have non-juicy veggies, or am I just a wimpy lady? ;)

Offline healthyinOhio

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Re: Nourishing Traditions
« Reply #16 on: July 22, 2006, 08:11:48 AM »
BUMP!! please. :)

Offline Chickory Chick

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Re: Nourishing Traditions
« Reply #17 on: July 22, 2006, 10:48:11 AM »
Just made my second lacto-fermented veggie and my first sauerkraut.  I pounded for 10 min. and again, I did not have the juice above my veggies.  Do I have non-juicy veggies, or am I just a wimpy lady? ;)

The first time I tried to make it (both times I didnt have way so used salt), the juice didnt come up over, the 2nd time it did.  I am not sure if it was the head of cabbage or what!
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Offline healthyinOhio

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Re: Nourishing Traditions
« Reply #18 on: July 22, 2006, 11:03:09 AM »
Kay,

Since the juice didn't come over it, can I still eat it?  Is it safe?  Or was my work in vain? ???

Offline mishy

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Re: Nourishing Traditions
« Reply #19 on: July 22, 2006, 11:06:30 AM »
I use a tall jar and then a wooden spoon.  I whack the wooden spoon down in the jar until I get juice.  I didn't have any problem with cabbage.  Hm.  I would think it is OK to eat if it smells fermented.  It says in NT that there is no way you would be able to eat the stuff if it were bad because it stinks so bad.  But fermented stuff does stink.  So?? 

Offline healthyinOhio

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Re: Nourishing Traditions
« Reply #20 on: July 22, 2006, 11:08:15 AM »
Thanks,

I will eat it.  But if I don't post anything here in the next few weeks, you will know why. ;)

Offline mishy

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Re: Nourishing Traditions
« Reply #21 on: July 22, 2006, 11:11:28 AM »
LOL   :D

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Re: Nourishing Traditions
« Reply #22 on: July 23, 2006, 10:16:43 AM »
This book takes a LONG time to get through but is worth every minute.  It is a health book/cook book in one.  Totally changed our perspective on eating, and now we cook almost everything we eat from this book, soaking, making whey, raw milk, yes lots of butter  ;D .  We were already cooking everything from scratch so it wasn't much of a transition, and you will find that pancakes and waffles taste SOOO much better when the flour is soaked in kefir, and oatmeal soaked in whey.  Oh, my, the food is SO much tastier.   :P  Also you have never had good almonds/cashews/pecans until you have had soaked and dehydrated ones.  Intensifies the flavor.   :P I am constantly soaking something, or making a stock, or dehydtrating, or whatever, but it is all worth it and just knowing we are healthier for it.  Plus lots more healthy kid labor!   ;D  The kids love the porridge also - we hardly ever buy dry cereal anymore. 

Nickole

Offline mexmarr

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Re: Nourishing Traditions
« Reply #23 on: July 23, 2006, 11:40:28 AM »
Yeah!  I just ordered Nourishing Traditions from Amazon!!!  I can't wait to get it!!!

It is marked down to $15.70 right now, and count's towards free shipping (if you spend $25).

Considing that it has 600 pages, I think that is a very good deal.

Offline Amey

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Re: Nourishing Traditions
« Reply #24 on: July 23, 2006, 05:37:25 PM »
I can vouch for what NT says about sauerkraut - if it goes bad, you will know it when you take a whiff. I had one jar go bad. It was one that only filled up about half of a jar (the last of the batch). It smelled awful. There's no mistaking when a jar goes bad.

Offline joyful_mommy_03

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Re: Nourishing Traditions
« Reply #25 on: July 23, 2006, 05:57:45 PM »
Just looked up this book on the public library website.  There are 6 copies of the book and 27 hold requests!!!  Yipes!  Must be an awesome book!

Offline ScottsHelper

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Re: Nourishing Traditions
« Reply #26 on: July 25, 2006, 04:23:36 PM »
I've enjoyed NT as well.  I have a question, though...I am nursing, and my baby is EXTREMELY sentitive to any dairy I eat, so I've had to leave out the whey when making the recipes.  I would really like to make a good sandwich bread with soaked flour, but the recipe in the book for sandwich bread does not give the option of leaving out the buttermilk and using vinegar or lemon juice.  Does anyone have a good "compromise" bread recipe for sandwiches that does not use dairy?  I've tried the sourdough recipe...it was WAY too sour and hard for my family's tastes right now!   I can't do too much experimenting resulting in failures, as much as I like to experiment...it's gettting too expensive!  :)

Heather

Offline healthybratt

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Re: Nourishing Traditions
« Reply #27 on: July 25, 2006, 05:12:11 PM »
I'm thinking about getting this book, but wanted to ask those of you who have read it a question.

I know the basic idea is to cook from scratch, grind and soak your own flour and make everything yourself, BUT does the author offer anything in the way of healthy and practical substitutions?  For instance, does her book tell you whether purchasing skim milk is a practical substitution for buying raw milk when it's not available or is she hard pressed on raw milk or goat milk only?  Does she offer tips on buying ground flours and how to use them or does she only tell you how to grind them yourself? 
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Offline Amey

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Re: Nourishing Traditions
« Reply #28 on: July 25, 2006, 05:42:41 PM »
Does anyone have a good "compromise" bread recipe for sandwiches that does not use dairy?
Heather

Sue Gregg's Whole Grain Bread recipe uses apple cider vinegar to soak the flour in. I think you could probably substitute vinegar or lemon juice for whey/buttermilk/kefir in any recipe, though. I have the recipe, but I don't know if it is ok to post it here since it is copyrighted from her cookbook. Anyone know? Urban Homemaker also has a recipe http://www.urbanhomemaker.com/articles/index.php?page=index_v2&id=318&c=18 where you can substitute. I use the Sue Gregg recipe and I like it better than the NT "compromise" yeast bread recipe and the Urban Homemaker recipe (I've tried both). A friend of mine likes the Urban Homemaker recipe best.

About dairy in Nourishing Traditions: they are very adamant about raw milk. If I remember right, you won't find much advice about choosing non-raw milk, but she does say that pasteurized but non-homogenized milk can be used for cultured milk products. Here's a quote I found (page 35):
Quote
If you cannot find good quality raw milk, you should limit your consumption of milk products to cultured milk, cultured buttermilk, whole milk yoghurt, butter, cream and raw cheeses.

She doesn't talk much about buying flour that I can see. She just mentions that if you do a lot of baking, "a home grain grinder is a must," but says unbleached white flour is good for dusting pans, rolling out doughs and kneading. Also for pie crusts.

Hope that helps!  ;D

Offline ScottsHelper

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Re: Nourishing Traditions
« Reply #29 on: July 25, 2006, 05:52:01 PM »
Thanks, Amey!  I have tried the Urban Homemaker's recipe, however, we didn't care for it as well...it may be because I did not use the dough conditioner (not sure if that's what it is called or not!).  Will have to find Sue Gregg's recipe to try.  My family loved NT's compromise bread with the buttermilk, but, like I said, I can't eat it now.  Maybe I'll do one more experiment and try to make it with the cider vinegar instead!

Heather