Author Topic: The Role of Fat and Carbohydrates in our Diet  (Read 6446 times)

Offline likemanywaters

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The Role of Fat and Carbohydrates in our Diet
« on: March 25, 2007, 08:30:53 AM »
And, behold, the glory of the God of Israel came from the way of the east: and his voice was like a noise of many waters: and the earth shined with his glory.

-Ezekiel 43:2

Offline likemanywaters

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"Lorenzo's Oil"
« Reply #1 on: April 23, 2007, 07:41:59 AM »
Who else has watched the movie Lorenzo's Oil?? Definitely deserves a thread of it's own. Watch it if you haven't!!  I've had several musings about it lately. Went back & rewatched it lately.

First, it was not olive oil, but eurucic (sp?) acid that was the cure. It was an extraction of rapeseed oil.  It was extracted from rapeseed oil by that man in the lab (chemically?). And that particular fatty acid if used long term has been linked heart leisions. That's why NT warns agains canola oil b/c of the high amound of eurucic acid in it. Of course in the case of Lorenzo's "disease" (ALD - Adrenoleukodystrophy) the immediate benefits of stalling the deadly stripping of the myelin would far outweigh any long term risks.

This movie also got me thinking... The role of fats play a major role in this movie. I've been meaning to read "Eat fat, lose fat".  I've been reading on this other sight too, www.biblelife.org, about the role of fats in our diet.  Suppose lack of enough good fats in his diet magnified his problem? When they put him on the strict diet, eliminating certain fats, but not replacing it with others, his blood count got worse quicker. Obviously I don't know enough about this, but seeing this come to play in our own home, and lately studying the adrenal glands to figure out what role cortisol levels were playing in my son's eczema, I think there's more to this movie than meets the eye.

Oh, and for those of you who have not seen it, it is a true story of how this boy's parents, in spite of the medical community, researched and discovered a way to stop the progression of their son's disease. Very encouraging for those of us who are doing what we can for our own kids. I'm quite suprise a movie like this actually made it onto the big screen...


(He reminded me of the movie "Lorenzo's Oil" which also uses olive oil as an ingredient to help a young boy.)
And, behold, the glory of the God of Israel came from the way of the east: and his voice was like a noise of many waters: and the earth shined with his glory.

-Ezekiel 43:2

Offline likemanywaters

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The Specific Carbohydrate Diet (SC Diet)
« Reply #2 on: May 11, 2007, 02:42:55 PM »
Found this on how a no complex carb diet helped a couple children with gastrointestinal problems like Chrohn's while I was looking for pediatric gastroenterologist information. It confirms to me that I am on the right track when I decided several months ago to eliminate complex carbs from my son's diet as a response to digestive issues he was having. Didn't eliminate his eczema completely, but it improved to just a few small spots again.

My input is in red below.

FROM THE JOURNAL OF PEDIATRIC GASTROENTEROLOGY AND NUTRITION . . .

It recently came to the attention of the SCD community that the June 2004 volume of the Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition contains an article describing two case studies involving the Specific Carbohydrate Diet. Each instance resulted in "complete recovery". The author of the article, Dr. Jacqueline Fridge, works as a Fellow in the Gastroenterology, Nutrition and Hepatology department of a Stanford, California children's hospital. Since public access to medical journals is limited, the full text appears below:


Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition
----------------------------------------------
Volume 39 Supplement 1 June 2004 pp S299-S300
----------------------------------------------
P0637 THE SPECIFIC CARBOHYDRATE DIET - A TREATMENT FOR CROHN'S DISEASE?
Fridge, J. L.1; Kerner, J.1; Cox, K.1
1Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, Lucile Packard Children's Hospital, Stanford Medical Center, Palo Alto, United States
Submitted by: jacqueline.fridge@medcenter.stanford.edu

Introduction:
Many diet therapies for Crohn's disease are known to be effective. It is not known which components of diets give the benefit, or which component of a regular diet is perpetuating the disease. We report two children with Crohn's disease who made a complete recovery on the Specific Carbohydrate Diet (SC Diet). One child received no other therapy, the other was steroid dependent prior to the diet. The diet eliminates all complex carbohydrates and refined sugars. In theory the diet deprives intestinal bacteria of the substrates they need to survive, reducing bacterial growth and the harmful products of fermentation.

Methods:
This is a case series to describe a novel diet therapy.

Results:
Case 1: An 11 year old girl presented with abdominal pain, weight loss and diarrhea. Laboratory examination revealed an albumin of 3.0 g/dL, hemoglobin (Hb) 11.6 g/dL and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) 17 mm/Hr. Serologies were positive with ASCA IgA 27.7 EU/ml and IgG 53.9 EU/ml, but pANCA was negative. Upper GI series (UGIS) showed multiple areas of stricture and mucosal cobblestoning in the jejunum and ileum, and a 5-6 cm stricture in the terminal ileum. (I really need to look at some anatomy charts!) Pathology was non-specific. The family refused standard care (hooray!) and following their own research elected to start the SC Diet. After 6 months on the diet her UGIS is normal, labs including ASCA antibodies have normalized and the patient is growing and symptom free.

Case 2: A 9 year old boy presented with a history of diarrhea, abdominal pain, poor appetite and no weight gain for 2 years. Laboratory examination revealed albumin 3.4 g/dL, Hb 12.0 g/dL and ESR 43 mm/Hr. ASCA IgA, IgG and pANCA were negative. UGIS showed narrowing of the distal ileum and proximal cecum. Pathology demonstrated focal acute colitis with crypt abcesses and granuloma formation. (can someone interpret this for me?) The patient responded well to treatment with sulfasalazine, prednisone and 6 mercaptopurine. Ten weeks after starting medications, during a steroid taper, his symptoms flared and his anemia returned. His prednisone was increased, but at this time the family elected to start the SC Diet. After 3 months on the diet the patient is off steroids, symptom free and all blood tests have normalized.

Conclusion:
The apparent effectiveness of the Specific Carbohydrate Diet in Crohn's Disease warrants more study. There is current interest in the manipulation of intestinal flora using probiotics and prebiotics. If this diet works by changing the bacterial flora of the bowel, then it adds weight to the role of bacteria in the pathogenesis of Crohn's Disease.

Reference(S):
Gottschall, Elaine: Breaking the Vicious Cycle - Intestinal Health Through Diet. Baltimore, Ontario, The Kirkton Press 2002.
And, behold, the glory of the God of Israel came from the way of the east: and his voice was like a noise of many waters: and the earth shined with his glory.

-Ezekiel 43:2

Offline likemanywaters

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The Specific Carbohydrate Diet
« Reply #3 on: May 11, 2007, 03:55:03 PM »
The Science Behind The Diet

Quote
The Vicious Cycle

When the balance in the gut is disturbed, an overgrowth of intestinal flora can result. Microbes migrate to the small intestine and stomach, inhibiting digestion and competing for nutrients. The gut then becomes overloaded with the byproducts of their digestion. This bacterial overgrowth can be triggered by overuse of antacids, reduced stomach acidity due to aging, weakening of the immune system through malnutrition or poor diet, and alteration of the microbial environment through antibiotic therapy.

The components of our diet, particularly carbohydrates, play an enormous role in influencing the type and number of our intestinal flora. When carbohydrates are not fully digested and absorbed, they remain in our gut, and become nutrition for the microbes we host. The microbes themselves must digest these unused carbohydrates, and they do this through the process of fermentation. The waste products of fermentation are gases, such as methane, carbon dioxide & hydrogen, and both lactic & acetic acids, as well as toxins. All serve to irritate and damage the gut. There is evidence that increased acidity in the gut due to malabsorption and fermentation of carbohydrates, may lead common harmless intestinal bacteria to mutate into more harmful ones. Further, lactic acid produced during the fermentation process has been implicated in the abnormal brain function and behaviour sometimes associated with intestinal disorders. The overgrowth of bacteria into the small intestine triggers a worsening cycle of gas and acid production, which further inhibits absorption and leads to yet more harmful byproducts of fermentation. The enzymes on the surface of the small intestines are destroyed by the now present bacteria, and this further disrupts the digestion and absorption of carbohydrates, leading to further bacterial overgrowth. As both the microbial flora and their byproducts damage the mucosal layer of the small intestine, it is provoked to produce excessive protective mucus, which further inhibits digestion and absorption.

Damage to the mucosal layer involves injury to the microvilli of our absorptive cells. These microvilli act as the last barrier between the nutrition we take in and our bloodstream. As our absorption is inhibited, folic acid and vitamin B12 deficiency can lead to impaired development of microvilli, while an abnormally thick layer of mucus prevents contact between microvilli enzymes and the carbohydrates we ingest. The small intestine responds to this spiraling irritation by producing more goblet (mucus-making) cells, creating yet more mucus. Finally, as the goblet cells become exhausted, the intestinal surface is laid bare, and is further damaged, and possibly ulcerated. As more carbohydrates are left in the gut, they cause water and nutrients to be pulled from the body into the colon, resulting in chronic diarrhea. Absorption is further hindered as diarrhea increases the rate with which food travels through the gut.

The Diet

"The Specific Carbohydrate Diet™ is based on the principle that specifically selected carbohydrates, requiring minimal digestive processes, are well absorbed and leave virtually none to be used for furthering microbial overgrowth in the intestine. As the microbial population decreases due to lack of food, its harmful byproducts also decrease, freeing the intestinal surface of injurious substances. No longer needing protection, the mucus-producing cells stop producing excessive mucus, and carbohydrate digestion is improved. Malabsorption is replaced by absorption. As the individual absorbs energy and nutrients, all the cells in the body are properly nourished, including the cells of the immune system, which then can assist in overcoming the microbial invasion." The simpler the structure of the carbohydrate, the more easily the body digests and absorbs it. Monosaccharides (single molecules of glucose, fructose, or galactose) require no splitting by digestive enzymes in order to be absorbed by the body. These are the sugars we rely on in the diet. They include those found in fruits, honey, some vegetables, and in yoghurt.

Double sugar molecules (disaccharides: lactose, sucrose, maltose and isomaltose) and starches (polysaccharides) are primarily avoided on the diet. Some starches have been shown to be tolerated, particularly those in the legume family (dried beans, lentils and split peas only). However, they must be soaked for 10-12 hours prior to cooking, and the water discarded since it will contain other sugars which are indigestible, but which are removed in the soaking process. Small amounts of legumes may only be added to the diet after about three months. The starches in all grains, corn, and potatoes must be strictly avoided. Corn syrup is also excluded since it contains a mixture of 'short-chain' starches.

Yoghurt

Finally, the SCD™iet relies on properly fermented yoghurt, and in some cases, acidophilus supplements, to help repopulate the gut with healthy intestinal flora. By increasing the population of 'good' bacteria in the gut, the overgrowth of harmful bacteria is put in check. As the competition for nutrition between the various strains of bacteria resumes, the variety of intestinal flora is brought back into balance. yoghurt must be properly prepared by fermenting it for 24 hours. This allows enough time for the bacteria in the yoghurt culture to break down the lactose (disaccharides) in milk, into galactose (a monosaccharide). All SCD™iet yoghurt is homemade, as commercially available yoghurts are not properly fermented.

Wow! This is amazing....
And, behold, the glory of the God of Israel came from the way of the east: and his voice was like a noise of many waters: and the earth shined with his glory.

-Ezekiel 43:2

Offline healthyinOhio

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Re: "Lorenzo's Oil"
« Reply #4 on: July 11, 2007, 05:54:55 AM »
Who else has watched the movie Lorenzo's Oil??

I BAWLED MY EYES OUT!!!!!!!!!!  :'(

Offline grocerygetter

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Re: The Role of Fat and Carbohydrates in our Diet
« Reply #5 on: July 11, 2007, 06:20:28 AM »
Great research skills! I love researching and finding out new info...I'm curious though because I was on here looking for info related to infant reflux and excema and I'm wondering how your research might answer part of my quesions...Would you think maybe his two conditions are related to the state of his gut and a possible food intolerance? I was thinking maybe especially because he was a preemie. What are your thoughts? Thanks!

Offline likemanywaters

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Re: The Role of Fat and Carbohydrates in our Diet
« Reply #6 on: July 11, 2007, 07:07:47 AM »
From all I've read, I think the two could definitely be related. I actually remember off the top of my head reading in the book "Unraveling the Mystery of Autism and Pervasive Developmental Disorders" by Karen Serrousi that among the many symptoms her babe had, he had infant reflux and eczema too. Just saying that to say I am SURE that my son's increasing digestive problems and increasing eczema were DEFINITELY related.  What does your babe's skin look like? Any yeasty diaper rashes? Red bottom?

Things that might help:

If you are nursing. You, taking digestive enzymes with your meals might help if they are sensitive to something you are eating. Or eliminating that something from your diet.  And making sure there is enought good fats & protein in your diet.

Probiotics could help.

Here are some other threads on this:
Eczema: Causes, Treatments & Cures
Acid Reflux: Symptoms & Treatments
« Last Edit: January 26, 2008, 08:56:53 AM by likemanywaters »
And, behold, the glory of the God of Israel came from the way of the east: and his voice was like a noise of many waters: and the earth shined with his glory.

-Ezekiel 43:2

Offline grocerygetter

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Re: The Role of Fat and Carbohydrates in our Diet
« Reply #7 on: July 11, 2007, 07:30:39 AM »
Thanks! My kido doesn't have any diaper rash & never has. His foreheard, head (under his hair), a shoulder, and a place on the chest are all effected. I am breastfeeding and might try cutting items out of my diet to see how that effects the situation. So, you think maybe if I take probiotics it would help too?

Offline likemanywaters

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Re: The Role of Fat and Carbohydrates in our Diet
« Reply #8 on: July 11, 2007, 09:10:47 AM »
I really don't know for certain, but it definitely wouldn't hurt. There is such a massive amount of info. on eczema. I just had to read as much as I could & compare that with my observations of my son. And so many different rashes are just labled eczema even when they often have different causes. I have had more experience with the type that is behind the knees & elbows & on the trunk of the body. I understand the scalp/face kind might have a different cause. Just a brief list would include: food intolerances or allergies, chemical / contact allergies (polyester, sodium lauryl sulfate), yeast (candida albicans) or fungus, leaky gut syndrome, nutritional deficiencies, just to name a few. How old is your kid? PS - I stopped using all liquid "soaps" (detergents) & it helped him some. Like, I never use shampoo on them at all. Only homemade soap if they need it. Sea salt baths help.

The most common things to cut out processed dairy, and possibly eggs? Read about raw dairy vs. store-bought. Or search for some nursing threads on here that might talk about it.

Sorry, HB this is beginning to sound like it needs to be moved to the Eczema thread.

PS - He is still off all complex carbohydrates and I think that is still helping him digest the rest of his food better and get more of what he was needing (more fats & proteins).
« Last Edit: July 11, 2007, 09:14:55 AM by likemanywaters »
And, behold, the glory of the God of Israel came from the way of the east: and his voice was like a noise of many waters: and the earth shined with his glory.

-Ezekiel 43:2

Offline BJ_BOBBI_JO

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Re: The Role of Fat and Carbohydrates in our Diet
« Reply #9 on: July 11, 2007, 09:43:46 AM »


The Cause, Prevention, Treatment and Control of Hypoglycemia, Insulin Dependent Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus and Adult Onset Type 2 Diabetes


 
I went to this site. It has some good interresting stuff on it to read.  I am saving it to my favorites so I can better look over it later on. Thank you for sharing it.  :)

I cant agree with it all. It states some blanket statements. LIke :

-Type 2 diabetes is not an inherited disease as often claimed.
( I agree with this statement but many times the predisposition for people to become insulin resistant is a family trait but that just means they have to choose to eat differantly in order to slow down or stop the onset of type 2 diabetes)

-Type 2 diabetes is 100% preventable by eating the low-carbohydrate diet..  ( IMO this is not correct because sometimes people get type 2 from having dye test done and other things. I dont know how but some certain test and things in life other then eating and sitting around can contribute to one becoming a type 2)

-Type 2 diabetes is 100% caused by eating excessive amounts of carbohydrates. ( see above. Also those who get gestational diabetes can get type 2 later on in life even if they eat low carb. each persons body is differant. What does excessive amounts of carbs mean? For eah person it is differant. For my body type  and diabetes I require very little carbs. But for my mom and her diabetes she requires a bit more carbs then me to keep herself level)

-Type 2 diabetes symptoms can be controlled by eating the low-carbohydrate diet. ( I believe this very much. The symptoms are caused by the blood sugars.  BUt a diabetic also needs to remember that not only does what we eat make our sugars go high but also so does our dreams, stress levels, amount of sleep, hormones, periods, breastfeeding,  pregnancy, times of high emotions and much more)

-Animal fats do not cause diabetes and do not make diabetes worse..
( eating more animal fats would mean one is eating a lower carb diet which is good for the blood sugars as long as the animal fat is not milk which is high in carbs. )

-----------------------------------------

I have been hearing and seeing some wrongful assumptions about people with type 2 diabetes. Such as:

-"if the type 2 would just eat low carb they would cure their diabetes or have better sugars.
( this if often times very true but not always. Sometimes a person can eat as good as they can for their body type and still have wild sugars. And from what I have learned not even type 2 can be 100% cured. type 2s sometimes eat low carb  lose weight and exersize  and as a result their type 2 appears to dissapear which makes them think they are cured but once they slow down or stop doing all that their type 2 comes back which would mean to me that it is not cured but instead being very well controlled by that person> Because if it was cured I would think it would not come back once they screw up and eat a donut)

-" if someone has type 2 they must be a fat lazy slob"
( this is often the assumption and is very wrong. I know of skinny type 2s who work very hard. And just because someone is fat does not mean they sit around eating 24/7 while while watching soaps and reruns. )

-" their diabetes is in bad shape because they must not be eating good enough"
( this is so not true considering that it is not just food that causes the sugars to go high as I typed way above)

-" a person is fat because they choose to eat to much"
( I know this is often times the truth but not always. Some peoples body just pile  the fat on more. My husband can eat donuts 24/7 and not gain an ounce but If I were to eat like that I would be 700 pounds by now. Also  everyones food needs for their body type is so differant. One might have to eat low carb in order to not gain weight while another might need a low calorie diet in order to lose weight. we are all so differant. One person could not be eating junk foods and not be drinking juice but instead eat healthy organic fresh fruits and they gain weight from it because fruit is to high in carbs. It is all in ones body disposition and how our bodies react to what we eat. It seems each person needs to learn what works best for their own body and try and eat in a way that helps them. It is trial and error until they learn what is best for their body type. For many years we have been bombarded with how we should eat low calorie low fat diets. That information has been killing many people off because a low cal diet can be rather high in carbs which makes many people fat and unhealthy)

From what I have learned our high carb modern lifestyles is a major factor in why so many people are becoming insulin resistant type 2 diabetics. Im sure those people do not choose that but we have all been missinformed for many years about how we should eat.

As of right now there are 3 types od diabetes which are type 1, type 2 and the lesser known type called type 1.5

I am a rare type called   " insulin resistant double diabetes" which means I display both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. I am a type 2 because I am extremely insulin resisant and a type 1 because I do not make my own insulin. This is because my last pregnancy ruined  the portion of the pancreas called 'islet of langerhans' and the beta cells with in the islet of langerhans. I was skinny strong lean and eating a very low carb diet when I got preg and my pancrease done this to me due to the stress of pregnancy. The pregnancy hormones can greatly contribute to insulin resistance even if the person is low carbing. Because of all that I am on a insulin pump forever. I can exersize and eat low carb until I am purple in the face and my diabetes will not heal itself, I know because I have tried many times. BUt some things do help like low carbing, weight lifting and some suppliments but they dont cure me.  I can find hope in weight lifting especialy. But I can eat a lettuce leaf and get high sugars so this is a battle but Im ok with it because at least I am alive and can walk around and do stuff.  :)

When I get to heaven I want for God to have me a giant fresh fruit and ice cream buffet since I wont be a diabetic in heaven I can enjoy fresh fruit at last without fears of what it will do to my blood sugars. LOL! I cant wait!




Offline likemanywaters

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Re: The Role of Fat and Carbohydrates in our Diet
« Reply #10 on: July 11, 2007, 03:14:19 PM »
Thank you. Thank you. It's always good to hear about things from a different perspective. Especially someone who knows a lot more about it that I do.  :)  I think the reason this guy is so passionate about this is because this diet helped him recover and wants to see it help others too...  Mmmmhh. Ice cream buffet in heaven!! They will have to have chocolate chip cookie dough & raspberry sorbet for sure.  ;)
And, behold, the glory of the God of Israel came from the way of the east: and his voice was like a noise of many waters: and the earth shined with his glory.

-Ezekiel 43:2

Offline its_me518

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Re: The Role of Fat and Carbohydrates in our Diet
« Reply #11 on: July 20, 2007, 05:27:54 AM »
Alright all who are interested in the Liver, pancreas, adrenals, carbohydrates, blood sugar, diabetes, hypoglycemia.. Here are some must read articles!

DISMANTLING A MYTH: The Role of Fat and Carbohydrates in our Diet

The Cause, Prevention, Treatment and Control of Hypoglycemia, Insulin Dependent Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus and Adult Onset Type 2 Diabetes

Insulin and Its Metabolic Effects

Ok, I looked at one of these sites and all I have to say is "IT'S INSANE!" :o How can people suggest eating tons and tons of FAT will cure them? They suggested eating a chicken thigh and leg for lunch and "make sure to eat all the skin and then drink the fat from the plate" That is absolutely disgusting and I do not think it is healthy AT ALL!!! :o :o :o
http://www.GenuineAid.com is the Natural Health Blog for Nutrients and Benefits of Fruits, Vegetables, Berries, Nuts, Meats, Dairy, Herbs, and other Foods.

Offline BJ_BOBBI_JO

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Re: The Role of Fat and Carbohydrates in our Diet
« Reply #12 on: July 20, 2007, 06:21:10 AM »
Alright all who are interested in the Liver, pancreas, adrenals, carbohydrates, blood sugar, diabetes, hypoglycemia.. Here are some must read articles!

DISMANTLING A MYTH: The Role of Fat and Carbohydrates in our Diet

The Cause, Prevention, Treatment and Control of Hypoglycemia, Insulin Dependent Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus and Adult Onset Type 2 Diabetes

Insulin and Its Metabolic Effects

Ok, I looked at one of these sites and all I have to say is "IT'S INSANE!" :o How can people suggest eating tons and tons of FAT will cure them? They suggested eating a chicken thigh and leg for lunch and "make sure to eat all the skin and then drink the fat from the plate" That is absolutely disgusting and I do not think it is healthy AT ALL!!! :o :o :o

LOL I would think that much fat would make us fatter also but my body proved that to be wrong.

In 2001 I found out about the dangers of eating to many carb grams per a day. I then went on a very low carb diet which meant I was eating lots and lots of fat like cheese, nuts, meats. I ate mostly veggies, cheese , eggs and meat for 7 months. As a result I lost 4 1/2 dress sizes. The fat inches about fell off of me.  Every day I would weigh myself and find I had lost ounces. In the begining I was losing about a pound a day then it slowed down to only losing a few ounces every day.

I know it sounds to good to be true but for my body it worked. I was also lifting weights to gain strength, make a lean body and help my blood sugars. It takes dedication and hard work.

I was eating no more then 75 grams of carbs a day. That is only 5 carb servings a day. Compared to the average carb grams a regular person eats a day that was very little. But I was not starving because I could eat filling foods like the cheeses, meats, nuts and tons and tons of veggies. But ew drinking the greese and fat is yucky and I will not ever do that.

Eating all that meat and cheese helped me lose weight due to I was not eating the carbs but for me eating lots of meat and dairy makes me weak and sick and messes with my digestive system so now I am trying  to eat lots of veggies, nuts  and eggs.

Also I noticed that when I was ultra low carbing and eating all those eggs and meat that my cholesterol went down to normal which confuses people because we are always taugh that those foods raise our cholesterol. I found on the internet and some books how eating a high cholesterol diet along with a high carb diet is what actually makes the cholesterol go sky high and stay that way. So my theory is since I was low carbing while eating high cholesterol that is why it went down to normal. I'm sure the weight lifting helped also.

Now because of diabetic complications  steming from a hard pregnancy that ruined a portion of my pancreas and this fast acting insulin I am back to square one trying to lose dress sizes again. So I say for people to eat low carb now so they wont get diabetes because once you get it it could get worse and worse and worse until there is nothing you can do to help it.

Until I can invent a free fat slurping machine to hook up to my body nightly I will have to  eat as low carb as I can afford to.
me throwing a fit-------------> " I WANT MY VERY OWN LIPOSUCTION MACHINE! I COULD HOOK UP TO IT NIGHTLY AND WAKE UP SKINNY. "

I REALY DO WANT ONE! lol   :D


Offline likemanywaters

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Re: The Role of Fat and Carbohydrates in our Diet
« Reply #13 on: July 20, 2007, 08:02:49 AM »
I don't think he's insane, but I definitely saw how increasing my fats & proteins (& thus lowering carbs) helped me and my DD when I was nursing my second. I was dropping too much weight and her skin was drying out. The fat is the best part.  ;D Mmmhhh. I have to lick the plate in the mornings when I make bacon & all that lovely grease is just sitting there. I think he's on the right track... And also the Eat Fat, Lose Fat !?! thread is on here somewhere. Experts agree.  ;)

PS - I used to think that too. Fat is unhealthy. It was programed into me thanks to all the mainstream "health" advise.
« Last Edit: July 20, 2007, 08:05:40 AM by likemanywaters »
And, behold, the glory of the God of Israel came from the way of the east: and his voice was like a noise of many waters: and the earth shined with his glory.

-Ezekiel 43:2

Offline healthyinOhio

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Re: The Role of Fat and Carbohydrates in our Diet
« Reply #14 on: July 20, 2007, 02:20:15 PM »
I have to lick the plate in the mornings when I make bacon & all that lovely grease is just sitting there.

Mmmmm.....that makes two of us.  ;)