Author Topic: Multi Purpose Healthier Flour?  (Read 6498 times)

Offline NotLuckyButBlessed

  • Adept
  • Posts: 395
Multi Purpose Healthier Flour?
« on: June 08, 2007, 05:22:10 AM »


We have eaten only whole grain, good-for-you bread for quite some time now. I buy it:) I bake plenty, especially for birthdays and holidays but have not baked with "healthy" grains other than plain old whole wheat.

However, now that we are milking our goats and I have kefir, whey and other products to use, I am wanting to start making some breads and other baked goods myself using "alternative" methods.

Anyone have any hints or rules of thumb for what kinds of flour to use for what? What one kind of healthier flour is most multi-purpose? I did see on another thread a little bit of discussion on it, but not much. Did I miss it somewhere else? Any good websites? I have used regular white flour or regular whole wheat for baking over the years but that is about it.

I just don't want to spend alot of money on a bunch of different kinds before I see what works, what we like, etc. I only live about an hour away from a great source (Bob's Red Mill) so shouldn't have any problems finding things.
View my blog at www.ButIHadATiara.blogspot.com
(private, request an invite by messaging me:)

"Sometimes we fear that fighting for what is right will kill us. Then it occurs to us that to stand by and do nothing out of self-preservation is to be dead already". ~ Beth Moore

Mom to treasured XXXXYX

Offline Maria/NHM

  • Adept
  • Posts: 684
    • My Blog
Re: Multi Purpose Healthier Flour?
« Reply #1 on: June 08, 2007, 05:41:43 AM »
I use barley flour for pastry flour. It works great.

« Last Edit: July 23, 2007, 04:38:49 AM by tjmjfamily »
My Blog
http://naturallyhealthymommy.blogspot.com/
Learning and sharing about nutrition and herbs
My user name used to be Ella :)

Offline NotLuckyButBlessed

  • Adept
  • Posts: 395
Re: Multi Purpose Healthier Flour?
« Reply #2 on: June 08, 2007, 06:44:33 AM »
As in cookies, cakes -- even for pie crusts? Do you grind the barley yourself?
View my blog at www.ButIHadATiara.blogspot.com
(private, request an invite by messaging me:)

"Sometimes we fear that fighting for what is right will kill us. Then it occurs to us that to stand by and do nothing out of self-preservation is to be dead already". ~ Beth Moore

Mom to treasured XXXXYX

Offline freckles

  • Learning
  • Posts: 13
Re: Multi Purpose Healthier Flour?
« Reply #3 on: June 08, 2007, 06:59:29 AM »
we like spelt. yes we grind it ourselves. its also a non-wheat. DH likes it in cookies, and carrot cake yummmmmm
 ;Dfrec

Offline ShabbyChic

  • Master
  • Posts: 1696
  • Wife, mom, motorcycle enthusiast, and chocoholic.
Re: Multi Purpose Healthier Flour?
« Reply #4 on: June 08, 2007, 07:15:47 AM »
We use a 1/2 and 1/2 mix of spelt/kamut or prairie gold wheat/ 7 grain for anything we bake (breads, cookies, etc.)  We have the berries and we grind them as we need them.  If I use all one grain it is always too something: too dry, too crumbly, too strong a taste, too dense...  So we break them.  We get them from Wheat Montana.
That's Shabby SHEIK not Shabby CHICK.  Hee-hee.

YoopreMama

  • Guest
Re: Multi Purpose Healthier Flour?
« Reply #5 on: June 08, 2007, 07:19:25 AM »
we like spelt. yes we grind it ourselves. its also a non-wheat.
Hi Freckles!  :)  I saw your intro a few days ago--welcome from the Upper Michigan!  ;D

Just a comment on spelt...I don't think spelt is truly considered non-wheat.   ???  Those w/ celiac disease (gluten-intolerance) are told to avoid it.  I think what gives spelt a "safe" reputation, though, is that some people who can't tolerate wheat can tolerate spelt.  I believe they are in the same family of grains.  

I know that this thread isn't about gluten, but in case someone is looking for gluten-free flour mixes..hey!  I should see if there's a thread on that!   ;)

Offline NotLuckyButBlessed

  • Adept
  • Posts: 395
Re: Multi Purpose Healthier Flour?
« Reply #6 on: June 08, 2007, 07:42:40 AM »


Thankfully, our family doesn't have any food allergy issues (except one ds who cannot have filberts/hazelnuts-- which is too bad since Oregon grows so many and I can get often them for free). But I am glad YM included that info for reference!

I have seen "prairie gold wheat" several times. I am assuming it is a certain type of wheat. Why would I buy that type instead of regular wheat? Is it heavier, lighter, more nutritious or ???
View my blog at www.ButIHadATiara.blogspot.com
(private, request an invite by messaging me:)

"Sometimes we fear that fighting for what is right will kill us. Then it occurs to us that to stand by and do nothing out of self-preservation is to be dead already". ~ Beth Moore

Mom to treasured XXXXYX

Offline ShabbyChic

  • Master
  • Posts: 1696
  • Wife, mom, motorcycle enthusiast, and chocoholic.
Re: Multi Purpose Healthier Flour?
« Reply #7 on: June 08, 2007, 08:09:55 AM »
Uhm, I'm not a real grain expert so all I know is the taste.  The prairie gold is not as strong of a taste as the bronze chief IMO.  If I were making a loak of 100% bronze chief and 100% prairie gold, the prairie gold would be lighter in color and density and flavor.  I don't think it is any less nutritious. 

When I was being introduced to whole grains (grinding, soaking, etc.) my friend D told me spelt is wheat's first cousin.  Spelt is crumblier, because it has less gluten.  So if you make biscuits out of 100% spelt they will be more like English Muffins.  That's my encounter.
That's Shabby SHEIK not Shabby CHICK.  Hee-hee.

Offline freckles

  • Learning
  • Posts: 13
Re: Multi Purpose Healthier Flour?
« Reply #8 on: June 08, 2007, 08:43:05 AM »
we like spelt. yes we grind it ourselves. its also a non-wheat.
Hi Freckles!  :)  I saw your intro a few days ago--welcome from the Upper Michigan!  ;D

Just a comment on spelt...I don't think spelt is truly considered non-wheat.   ???  Those w/ celiac disease (gluten-intolerance) are told to avoid it.  I think what gives spelt a "safe" reputation, though, is that some people who can't tolerate wheat can tolerate spelt.  I believe they are in the same family of grains.  

I know that this thread isn't about gluten, but in case someone is looking for gluten-free flour mixes..hey!  I should see if there's a thread on that!   ;)

You are right I looked it up! It is a high gluten. I read it as a non wheat not gluten free, I can see how a non wheat can be thought gluten free. We love Kamut/oat  "awfulls" (waffles 4yr DS) spelt biscuits, bread, cookies and cakes. I also use other wheat and non-wheats. Throw them in the mill and away we go. I use Almond milk in most everything just to add good stuff it makes things stick together I think and yummy. We have no food allergies here :)

freckles 

YoopreMama

  • Guest
Re: Multi Purpose Healthier Flour?
« Reply #9 on: June 08, 2007, 11:29:15 AM »
Thankfully, our family doesn't have any food allergy issues...But I am glad YM included that info for reference!

When I was being introduced to whole grains (grinding, soaking, etc.) my friend D told me spelt is wheat's first cousin.  Spelt is crumblier, because it has less gluten. 
You are right I looked it up! It is a high gluten. I read it as a non wheat not gluten free, I can see how a non wheat can be thought gluten free. We have no food allergies here :) freckles 

You know what I LOVE about the Ladies here at WTM?  The graciousness.   :-*  Even w/ text alone (and faces!  :D ), I really sensed your all's grace toward my post. 

In retrospect, I had no business jumping in on this nice discussion to digress on gluten.  :-X  :-[  I apologize for that!

I think I do need to find that thread on gluten-free flour blends!   ;D

Offline NotLuckyButBlessed

  • Adept
  • Posts: 395
Re: Multi Purpose Healthier Flour?
« Reply #10 on: June 08, 2007, 12:00:18 PM »

Actually I am glad you did.  On this subject, among many, I have little to no knowledge other than what I read in NT and here. Even then I cannot remember everything so I wouldn't consider it "learned". I really appreciate all of the input I am getting.

View my blog at www.ButIHadATiara.blogspot.com
(private, request an invite by messaging me:)

"Sometimes we fear that fighting for what is right will kill us. Then it occurs to us that to stand by and do nothing out of self-preservation is to be dead already". ~ Beth Moore

Mom to treasured XXXXYX

Offline Youthful One

  • Adept
  • Posts: 229
    • Stayin' Home and Lovin' It!
Re: Multi Purpose Healthier Flour?
« Reply #11 on: June 08, 2007, 09:18:27 PM »
Okay, I'll jump in because you asked me personally  ;), but I can't be of too much help.

Prior to my son's semi-diagnosis of celiac or gluten-intolerance, I used only whole wheat or occasionally white flour.  I used to use whole wheat pastry flour quite often.

I love to bake (well, I love to cook too), and it was a rough adjustment for the first few months to go gluten-free.

The flours we use now are brown rice, white rice, tapioca flour (a starch), potato starch, cornstarch, and occasionally cornmeal, millet flour, garfava (a blend of garbanzo and fava bean flours), quinoa flour and sweet rice flour.  Oh!  I am also now including more almond 'flour', aka almond meal. 

IMO, I wouldn't bother with the rice flours and starches unless you were catering to food allergies/gluten intolerance.  I've one friend allergic to quinoa and sensitive to bean flours, and another allergic to brown rice.  Balancing out the rice flour crumbliness is very difficult.  It can also produce a corseness in the crumb that is far from the pleasant chewiness that comes from gluten. :-\

I really miss whole grain bread - it was what I've had all my life. ::)

If I were to suggest any flours to incorporate or experiment with it would be the quinoa flour and the almond flour.  Both would offer a higher protein profile to your product.  The almond meal doesn't impart a bold flavor, but just a slight nuttiness - actually the quinoa does too.  I wouldn't recommend using them as a cup-for-cup substitute, but substituting them for maybe 1/3 to 1/2 of the flour called for.  Certainly no more than 1/2, as they will change the texture.  Bob's doesn't carry quinoa flour in small quantities - I did find it there in the 25 lb bags. ::)  And you are welcome to grind your own almonds to meal (I have done that before), but the price at TJ's for almond meal is only $.20 more per pound/package than the whole almonds.  Gee, now that I type that it sounds so much more expensive...

BTW- if you need something from Bob's, or are interested in prices at their store, I go at least once/month sometimes twice.  I can pick you up something or get prices for you - they do have a bulk section and offer 10% off their cases of packaged items.

Now, off to find YM on the thread of GF flour blends- I've got a number of those recipes I'm still perfecting. ::) ;D
Stayin' Home and Lovin' It!

"... it is better to have a heart without words than words without a heart."  ~ John Bunyan

Offline floydian

  • Master
  • Posts: 1586
Re: Multi Purpose Healthier Flour?
« Reply #12 on: September 03, 2007, 03:40:01 AM »
We just received about 15 lbs of millet.  I like to add the whole little seeds to muffins and breads for the crunch, but this is a LOT of millet.  Can you grind millet and use the flour for things in which you would normally use white flour--biscuits, cookies, muffins?

And as He stands in victory,
Sin's curse has lost its grip on me;
For I am His and He is mine—
Bought with the precious blood of Christ.

YoopreMama

  • Guest
Re: Multi Purpose Healthier Flour?
« Reply #13 on: September 03, 2007, 06:54:56 AM »
Can you grind millet and use the flour for things in which you would normally use white flour--biscuits, cookies, muffins?
I did the other day--added it to my overnight pancake batter (w/ brown rice and oats).  YUM!  Wonder how it'd be in your corn bread? 

Offline skelliott2

  • Adept
  • Posts: 577
Re: Multi Purpose Healthier Flour?
« Reply #14 on: September 03, 2007, 07:45:45 AM »
You can definitely use millet as flour, but it is a gluten free grain, so it probably wouldn't rise very well on its own. 

Offline lotsaboys

  • Master
  • Posts: 1796
Re: Multi Purpose Healthier Flour?
« Reply #15 on: September 03, 2007, 09:17:06 AM »
Can you grind millet and use the flour for things in which you would normally use white flour--biscuits, cookies, muffins?
I did the other day--added it to my overnight pancake batter (w/ brown rice and oats).  YUM!  Wonder how it'd be in your corn bread? 

Hey, thanks for the ideas! I've got a bunch of millet to use, too. Let us know of any other things its good in and I'll do the same- if I remember. ::)

Offline Youthful One

  • Adept
  • Posts: 229
    • Stayin' Home and Lovin' It!
Re: Multi Purpose Healthier Flour?
« Reply #16 on: September 03, 2007, 12:12:27 PM »
Can you grind millet and use the flour for things in which you would normally use white flour--biscuits, cookies, muffins?
I did the other day--added it to my overnight pancake batter (w/ brown rice and oats).  YUM!  Wonder how it'd be in your corn bread? 

I have a recipe for Millet Corn Bread.  My mom makes it fairly often.  It comes from a local cookbook author/instructor, David Gabbe.

First, you prepare and grind your own Millet Flour:

2 cups raw millet

1.Preheat oven to 225.
2. Before rinsing millet, pick through and remove any stones or other foreign matter.
3. Thoroughly rinse millet by placing it in bowl with water.  Swish vigorously.  Transfer millet to strainer and rinse well.
4. Spread millet in ungreased baking dish or baking pan.
5. Place in oven and bake 30 minutes, stirring after 15 minutes.
6. Remove millet from oven and allow to cool completely.
7. Place 1 cup millet in blender and grind into flour (about 20-30 seconds).  Remove flour from blender and grind remaining millet.
Note:
Refrigerate and use within 14 days, or freeze for longer period.
Yield: 2 cups

Millet Cornbread


2 c    Millet Flour
2 t    baking powder
1/2 t salt

1/2 c raw almonds
1 c    apple juice

1/2 c  maple syrup
1 medium apple (peeled and chopped)
1 c     corn kernels (fresh or frozen)
1 t     vanilla extract

1. Preheat oven to 350.
2. In bowl, combine first 3 'dry' ingredients.
3. Sort through almonds and discard any broken or discolored ones.  Rinse almonds.
4. In blender, blend almonds and juice until smooth.
5. Add next 4 ingredients to blender and blend until smooth.
6. Pour blender mix into bowl of dry ingredients, mixing thoroughly.
7. Transfer batter into oiled 8" square (or similar size) baking dish or 3 small oiled loaf pans.
8. Bake 40 minutes or until golden brown.
9. Cover with butter just before serving.  (He recommends Spectrum Spread.)
Note: This bread is at its best - moist and tender - for the first day or so; thereafter it gets dry and crumbly.  Refrigerate leftovers and use withing 2-3 days.
Yield: 4-6 servings
Variation: For a cornier bread, add 1 cup corn kernels (fresh or frozen) to batter in step 6 and continue as directed.


MY favorite millet recipe is this:
(HOWEVER, I omit the soy milk powder/water and use cow or goat milk instead.  I don't heat the milk prior to mixing.)


Millet Delight
 A casserole made of millet, dates, coconut, and vanilla makes for a delicious and nutritious breakfast.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Ingredients:

1 cup uncooked millet
1/2 cup soy milk powder
5 1/2 cups hot water
2/3 cup chopped dates
1/2 cup flaked coconut
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
 
Prep Time:   15 mins
Cook Time:   75 mins
Ready In:      90 mins
 
Serves:   8
 
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Directions:
 
1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C).
 
2. Combine millet, soy milk powder, hot water, chopped dates, coconut, and vanilla in a 9x13 inch casserole dish.
 
3.  Bake casserole in preheated oven for 30 minutes, then remove and stir. Return casserole to oven and bake an additional 30 minutes. Serve hot.

----------------
I've also made a variation of this using chopped apples and cranberries when I was out of dates/coconut.  YUMMY!   ;D


My kids and I LOVE Millet Delight.  It is a special treat, only because I rarely get up ahead of the kids enough to get it baked in time for breakfast.  ::)
Stayin' Home and Lovin' It!

"... it is better to have a heart without words than words without a heart."  ~ John Bunyan

Offline mrs_zog

  • Adept
  • Posts: 81
  • Joseph's Coat rose bush:a gift from my parents
Re: Multi Purpose Healthier Flour?
« Reply #17 on: September 03, 2007, 01:48:23 PM »
Spelt is crumblier, because it has less gluten.  So if you make biscuits out of 100% spelt they will be more like English Muffins.  That's my encounter.

Would someone please share a spelt English-Muffin-like-biscuit recipe???? I read that to DH and he said, YUMM! and asked me to make some.....The batter I have sitting in the bowl looks like it would make good pancakes, but not biscuits.    :o

Thanks!
A woman is like a tea bag--only in hot water do you realize how strong she is. ~Nancy Reagan