Author Topic: Sanitary Products: Cloth vs Disposable  (Read 94873 times)

Offline konk

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Sanitary Products: Cloth vs Disposable
« on: April 11, 2006, 10:29:07 AM »
I have been wondering about what to do with this.  I don't think my daughters are mature enough for anything like a Divacup but we don't wash diapers at this time and I'm not sure what to do about them.  Is hemp anti-bacterial enough?  The comment above about it being toxic is fairly accurate but mostly, from what I understand, because bacteria have a hey-day in it - including some of the most dangerous diseases out there.  It is rich for developing babies but in another environment, very rich for developing sickness.  I assume, though I've not studied, that this is probably the main non-spiritually related purpose (the spiritual ones I'll leave to the theologians) behind the very strict treatment of it.  Leprosy was a big one, for example.  I doubt we would be exposed to AIDS and hepatitis but various things like strep and staph infections breed this way too.

I realize we now have better ways of dealing with hygiene in such circumstances but I wonder if disposable is still better in this instance?  I want to do the healthier thing but I honestly haven't a clue how to clean and disinfect them and how to store them while waiting!  ???  Does anyone know kind of chemicals are in disposable pads and is there a brand that doesn't have them? 

Offline petrimama

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Re: Sanitary Products: Cloth vs Disposable
« Reply #1 on: April 11, 2006, 11:09:30 AM »
I also went cloth when I started with cloth diapers.  I have only gotten my period 7 times in the past 6 1/2 years (all the preg & nursing), so I am not an expert on them, but I have found that keeping the used ones in a bucket of water and germicide followed by adding germicide to the detergent sets my mind at ease regarding disease.  Granted I do laundry often and I use gentle, organic cleaners, so I feel okay with this system.  I am not interested in the disposeables because I am very sensitive to chemicals and they are just so expensive!  Isn't it funny how different people have such very different preferences about so many things?  I guess that's why web forums work! ~L

Offline ecajean

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Re: Sanitary Products: Cloth vs Disposable
« Reply #2 on: April 11, 2006, 01:23:11 PM »
Here is a link to some info on the sanitary aspects of cloth:
http://perfectpads.net/sanitary.html

Here's a link about hemp too:
http://perfectpads.net/hemp.html

And more info on the kind of pads I use, including how to wash and care for them:
http://perfectpads.net/cloth_pads_101.html

Christina, the maker of these also has organic cotton as well. I've used a urn type pot filled with cold water to soak them in before too. Each day I'd replace the water. Then with the cloth diapers (or separately too) do a rinse cycle in cold water before a regular warm water wash. Use like 1/4 of the normal amount of detergent. Since the hemp absorbs you want to make sure all the laundry soap is rinsed.

Anyway, I guess this thread is about the Diva Cup but I wanted toadd this in...

ERica

Offline mrsroeser

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Re: Sanitary Products: Cloth vs Disposable
« Reply #3 on: April 13, 2006, 03:34:20 PM »
Hmmmm... all very interesting... I just checked out that website for the hemp pads... I just bought a keeper (latex version of the diva cup)... because I just got my period back a year after childbirth. I wish I would have known about these pads!  Now I want to get those!! ack!! ::)  The last thing I want to do is become a menstrual product junkie!! hahaha..  :D

Offline Grace

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Re: Sanitary Products: Cloth vs Disposable
« Reply #4 on: September 10, 2006, 04:24:27 PM »
What is a Diva cup?????
DD's 4 1/2 and 3 1/2 and DS born 7/6/08!

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Offline Grace

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Re: Sanitary Products: Cloth vs Disposable
« Reply #6 on: September 20, 2006, 05:40:43 AM »
When I have a period, after about 3 or 4 days I start getting all itchy. I use diposable pads. I change them often and take a shower every day. Am I allergic to the pads? Is this normal? Thanks.
DD's 4 1/2 and 3 1/2 and DS born 7/6/08!

Offline miff aka Missi

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Re: Sanitary Products: Cloth vs Disposable
« Reply #7 on: September 20, 2006, 05:44:26 AM »
When I have a period, after about 3 or 4 days I start getting all itchy. I use diposable pads. I change them often and take a shower every day. Am I allergic to the pads? Is this normal? Thanks.
This is normal for me.  But we both may be allergic.  I'd like to know about this too. 

Missi

Offline SarahK

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Re: Sanitary Products: Cloth vs Disposable
« Reply #8 on: September 20, 2006, 06:00:46 AM »
When I use pads post-partum, I get super itchy after a few days too.  I assumed it was related to the plastic backing on those things - keeps any heat/moisture in close and sticky. Haven't had much experience with them beyond post-partum though...

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Offline Grace

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Re: Sanitary Products: Cloth vs Disposable
« Reply #9 on: September 20, 2006, 09:19:16 AM »
When I have a period, after about 3 or 4 days I start getting all itchy. I use diposable pads. I change them often and take a shower every day. Am I allergic to the pads? Is this normal? Thanks.
Just wanted to bump this up and see if ANYBODY knows??? It is very annoying!
DD's 4 1/2 and 3 1/2 and DS born 7/6/08!

Offline Ruby

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Re: Sanitary Products: Cloth vs Disposable
« Reply #10 on: September 20, 2006, 10:31:00 AM »
I get itchy too and develop a rash.  I don't know if it's the plastic or perhaps the chemicals they use to make them, or both.   I haven't been able to find much information on the chemicals used, although I've read chlorine bleach is one of them. I've also read that trace levels of dioxin were found in femine products as a biproduct of the bleaching process. I did switch to cloth pads though and feel so much better with them.  If I'm going to be traveling or out for long periods of time during the day, I'll wear the disposable ones.  But even after a few hours they are itchy.  NatraCare has some disposable pads that do not itch, but they are expensive and I cannot wear them on a heavy day.  Only the pads with "wings" tend to work the best.  There is a little information on the Natracare website about chemicals but not much.   I would definitely say it should not be normal to itch like that during your cycle.  When I switched to cloth, all those problems went away.

Offline mexmarr

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Re: Sanitary Products: Cloth vs Disposable
« Reply #11 on: April 16, 2007, 01:54:31 AM »
I know this is an old topic, but, I want to see if we can get some more responses.

There is a ton of info about the Diva cup, Keeper and Instead, and there are a lot of coments about how bad disposable pads are but... I want more info on WHY disposable pads are bad.

I am looking for specifics, facts, links or testimonials.

YoopreMama

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Re: Sanitary Products: Cloth vs Disposable
« Reply #12 on: April 16, 2007, 02:09:04 AM »
I know this is an old topic, but, I want to see if we can get some more responses.

There is a ton of info about the Diva cup, Keeper and Instead, and there are a lot of coments about how bad disposable pads are but... I want more info on WHY disposable pads are bad.  I am looking for specifics, facts, links or testimonials.

Wasn't there a thread on "feminine hygiene" or something that had something in there about the arsenic in pads (that makes you bleed more)?  Sorry so vague...I had a link to a site, let's see if I can find it...
http://www.whynaturalpads.com/ is the site, but I don't think it was too specific.  If I find something, I'll holler!
***********************************************
Under the "Health and the Environment" tab: (It's quite lengthy, so I'll just briefly list the dangers):

Quote
Chlorine bleaching

Chlorine bleaching releases toxins into the environment, and will leave detectable residuals in the end product.

There are different types of chlorine bleaches used today in the paper and feminine hygiene industry. The main causes of dioxin pollution being Elemental chlorine (also called chlorine gas), as well as Elemental chlorine-free bleach. This bleach is not free of chlorine at all. The use of chlorine-free in this case means that it is not bleached using Elemental chlorine, called chlorine gas.

Dioxin pollution

Dioxins are some of the most deadly chemicals created. Classified as carcinogenic, (cause cancer) dioxins are found in pesticides, plastics, solvents, detergents and cosmetics. For over a decade, concerns have been raised about the impact of dioxins on our health with respect to heart and liver disease, hormonal disruption and cancer, to name but a few.

Dioxins, furans and PCB’s, which are generally referred to as dioxin-like compounds, are highly toxic organochlorines. These compounds are extremely fat seeking. There are some natural organochlorines in the atmosphere, but considerably greater amounts of artificially produced ones.
The production of dioxins in the manufacture of paper pulp products such as tampons and sanitary pads, are not only harmful to the environment, but also unnecessarily expose women to low levels of dioxins every time they use these products. Dioxin settles in the fat cells of our bodies and stay there for the rest of our lives, building up cumulatively over time from birth, so increased exposure means increased risk.

Pesticides

Pesticide use is widespread in the world and responsible for some of the more persistent dioxins and furans in the environment.

Agricultural pesticides have been linked to infertility, suicidal depression and the most horrific birth defects imaginable.  A deadly circle, for among them – as among pesticides from Europe – are substances that can damage the eyes, skin, immune and glandular systems, cause heart disease, asthma and cancer, and – most insidious of all – harm human sperm and eggs, impair the minds and bodies of unborn babies, and cause miscarriages, stillbirths and infant deaths. Governments routinely approve of thousands of pesticides without ever undergoing any notable safety testing, and pesticide regulations also ignore the potential for genetic vulnerability.

Hormones are the body’s chemical messengers and are not only involved in fertility but in the growth and functioning of the brain and body. One of the pesticide industry’s bright ideas was to create chemicals that disrupt these endocrine messengers. Unfortunately, widely differing species use almost identical chemical messengers. So what disrupts a mosquito also damages larger creatures, including humans.

Preservatives

These are chemical substances used to kill the bacteria in foods and non-foods to prevent bacteria, moulds and fungus from making the product inedible and unusable.

The most commonly used preservatives are often a mix of compounds that are used together in cosmetics and commercial products such as shampoos, lotions, sunscreens, wet wipes, toothpaste, medicines, fabric softeners, cleaners and washing materials. Many of these preservatives release a toxic chemical called formaldehyde, which can also cause dermatitis. (Is that the source of our itching?)
Formaldehyde

Formaldehyde has recently been declared a potential carcinogen. It is a chemical that is used in many products in our environment and some sources may be surprising because it is so widespread, even at low levels, that it is almost impossible to avoid in our daily lives. Formaldehyde is not only a sensitizer, but also a potent irritant. Frequent or prolonged exposure may cause hypersensitivity, leading to the development of dermatitis through contact with products containing formaldehyde in the form of preservatives, or clothing made from fabrics that have been treated with it.

Parabens

Dr Philippa Darbre and colleagues at the University of Reading carried out tests on samples of 20 different human breast tumours. Writing in the Journal of Applied Toxicology, they say they found traces of parabens in every sample. Their tests suggested the chemicals had seeped into the tissue after being applied to the skin. (2)

"This is the first study to show their accumulation in human tissues," said Dr Darbre. "It demonstrates that if people are exposed to these chemicals, then the chemicals will accumulate in their bodies."

In late 1998 John Sumpter's group at Brunel University, UK, published a paper identifying parabens as oestrogen mimics (Routledge et al., 1998). As mimics, this means that the chemicals act like the hormone oestrogen in the body, interfering with the body’s natural systems. The authors state:

"Given their use in a wide range of commercially available topical preparations, it is suggested that the safety in use of these chemicals should be reassessed, with particular attention being paid to estimation of the actual levels of systemic exposure of humans exposed to these chemicals. The acquisition of such data is a prerequisite to the derivation of reliable estimates of the possible human risk of exposure to parabens."

Phenoxyethanol

Phenoxyethanol is a preservative added to cosmetics, ointments, eardrops and vaccines. It is commonly used in toiletries and wipes, even in some products that claim to be natural. The manufacturers of this chemical describe the toxicology of phenoxyethanol as: -

“Harmful if swallowed, inhaled or absorbed through the skin. May cause reproductive defects. Severe eye and skin irritant. “

Some research that was conducted by S. Bohn, A. J. Bircher in 2001 (3) at the Allergy Unit of the Dept. of Dermatology at University Hospital in Basel, Switzerland, found some hypersensitivity to phenoxyethanol. Including urticaria, hand eczema as well as generalized eczema in an 18-month-old boy within 24 hours after receiving the DPT (diphtheria, pertussus, tetanus) vaccine. Whilst the researchers consider the reactions to be very rare, it brings into question the suitability of this chemical as an ingredient in products used on the skin of babies.

Imidazolidinyl urea

Imidazolidinyl urea is the second most identified cosmetic preservative causing contact dermatitis according to The American Academy of Dermatology.
Imidazolidinyl urea is a formaldehyde-releasing preservative used in many cosmetics, toiletries, lotions and pharmaceutical preparations and is often found in preparations labelled as ‘hypoallergenic’. However, if you have sensitivity to Imidazolidinyl urea, these products are far from hypoallergenic and should be avoided, as it will cause dermatitis. Try to avoid other formaldehyde-releasing preservatives also known by the following names: Quaternium-15, 2-bromo-2nitropropane-1,3-diol, diazolidinyl urea.

Sodium Lauryl Sulphate (SLS)

SLS is commonly used in shampoos, hair conditioners and shower gels.  It is a very harsh detergent used to make the products foam when used. SLS can cause irritation of the eyes, skin rashes and flaking skin, and possibly permanent damage to the eyes, especially in children.

Chemicals in body care

Propylene Glycol is a solvent used in cosmetics, hair care products, deodorants and after-shave.  It is also the main ingredient in antifreeze and brake fluid and is considered to be a skin irritant causing dermatitis, especially in children. 

Polyethylene Glycol (PEG), a related agent found in most skin cleansers, is a caustic used to dissolve grease and is the same substance found in oven cleaners.   

Isopropyl Myristate , an alcohol used in hair rinses, hand lotions and fragrances, is also a solvent that dries the skin and hair, and creates cracks and fissures in the skin, which encourage bacterial growth.

Phthalates are a large family of industrial chemicals linked to birth defects in the male reproductive system. Hundreds of animal studies have demonstrated that phthalates can damage the liver, kidneys, lungs and reproductive system, especially the developing testes. Phthalates are used as a plastic softener and solvent in many different consumer products. They can be absorbed through the skin, inhaled as fumes, ingested when they contaminate food or when children bite or suck on plastic toys, and are inadvertently directly administered to patients from PVC (polyvinyl chloride or vinyl) medical devices.

Genetically modified cotton

The science of genetically modified crops is in its early stages and long-term outcome is not yet certain. However, many people choose not to consume genetically modified foods because they are worried about the possible negative health effects. Over 50% of the world’s cotton is genetically modified and, unless products state that they are made with certified organic cotton, then it is likely that they are made from genetically modified cotton.

Endangered forests

Most of the world’s wood pulp used to make paper products, which includes tampons, sanitary pads, toilet paper and newspapers, comes from forests that have been ravaged by large pulping companies.

Sanitary waste

Since 1985, the trend has been towards thinner sanitary pads using less wood-based pulp and increased use of synthetic super absorbents made from petroleum. Apertured plastic film is mostly used as a cover on sanitary pads and liners today, and is often called the " Dri-weave top sheet". In reality, it is simply just loaded polyethylene film - or plastic with holes in to you and me.

European and North American consumption of this type of sanitary pad is the highest in the world - more than a third of total worldwide consumption of 45 billion units - All eventually needing to be disposed of somewhere! Every year, in Britain alone, we would need to dig a hole 300 feet wide and 300 feet deep to bury the used sanitary pads and tampons that women throw away.

Despite the environmental pressures of the early 90's, sanitary protection is still being made from more and more plastic materials. There is, therefore, the need to raise consumer awareness about the proper disposal of these products. Most people are not even aware of the high loading of plastics in the products they use, and it does not help that manufacturers of these products are unwilling to print a full list of the materials they use on their packaging.

Disposal of used sanitary products is either by flushing out to sea, incineration, or depositing in landfill sites. Various pollutants, including dioxins, are continually deposited in the sea through sewage waste and air pollution from incinerators. This not only irreversibly damages and contaminates fish and other sea life; it inevitably results in human exposure to these toxins when we consume these plants and animals.

Most women are aware that flushing sanitary pads results in the contamination of our oceans, rivers, and many are prepared to dispose of their pads along with the domestic waste which is either incinerated or buried in landfill sites. Incineration is a major cause of pollution worldwide. However, the alternative of burying rubbish in the ground is not much of an improvement because the plastics used in sanitary pads and liners and tampon applicators do not biodegrade at all, and will remain in the environment unchanged for hundreds of years.

Irritation

When women develop irritation problems such as thrush, vaginitis or soreness, they are always advised by doctors and health specialists to wear cotton underwear, but without thinking, they are unwittingly continuing to use their usual brand of feminine hygiene made from loaded synthetics every month during their period. Women suffering from skin allergies, irritation, soreness and itching, may find their symptoms are worse during their period, due to the synthetic and plastic ingredients in most sanitary products. Many gynaecologists advise such women to change to all-cotton products in order to avoid the synthetics and chemicals commonly used in hygiene products. After making the change to Natracare organic cotton tampons and natural totally chlorine-free pads, many of these women have found relief from their symptoms.

Endometriosis

“Endometriosis is a hormonal and immune disease in which tissue like that found in the lining of the uterus, grows outside of the uterus in other parts of the body.  Endometriosis is one of the leading causes of pelvic pain and can lead to infertility, hysterectomy, and increased risk of developing certain cancers.  Dioxin is directly correlated with an increased incidence of endometriosis, according to a 1992 study (5) on rhesus monkeys exposed to TCDD for four years.

Toxic Shock Syndrome ( TSS)

Toxic Shock Syndrome (TSS) is a rare but fatal disease caused by a particular type of bacteria that can produce toxins in the body. The symptoms of TSS come on fast and are often severe. Menstrual TSS has been linked to the use of super-absorbent and synthetics in tampons. (1)


This was from a site that sells Natracare feminine hygiene products, so know that they are biased.   :-\  There are several studies cited, though.
« Last Edit: April 16, 2007, 06:07:30 AM by YooperMama »

Offline ladyhen

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Re: Sanitary Products: Cloth vs Disposable
« Reply #13 on: April 16, 2007, 03:37:03 AM »
When I talked to my teen dds about the warnings on disposable sanitary napkins, they were in full agreement that an alternative was preferred.  I showed them some of the ready-made cotton pads on the internet, and they agreed that they would love to try them.  I make our own pads, and - by popular vote- I do the washing.  We are very happy with this arrangement.
The thirteen year old was having actual pain just from contact with the disposable napkins.
Looking for that blessed hope, and the glorious appearing of the great God and our Saviour Jesus Christ;    Titus 2:13

YoopreMama

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Re: Sanitary Products: Cloth vs Disposable
« Reply #14 on: April 16, 2007, 06:10:47 AM »
I agree--I just started cotton pads/reusable pads in the last cycle or 2.  MUCH better (bleed less) and I feel better knowing it's healthier for me (and my children).  I NEVER would have thought I'd do this!   :-[ ;D ::)

Offline BJ_BOBBI_JO

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Re: Sanitary Products: Cloth vs Disposable
« Reply #15 on: April 16, 2007, 09:34:29 AM »
Do the cloth pads actualy work when it comes to heavy clotty periods? Do they do a good job of containing the blood so it isnt running all over the place and staning the clothes?

Im just wondering. Someday my daughters will have periods. And I remember what it was like as a teenage girl to worry about having period stains on the pack of my paints.

When it comes time for them to have their periods I dont want them to use the diva cup because its kind of grose and creepy. Perhaps I just need to learn more about it. I dont understand how it can be comfortable and safe to hold in all the blood and clots?
« Last Edit: April 16, 2007, 09:36:42 AM by BJ_BOBBI_JO »

kaira

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Re: Sanitary Products: Cloth vs Disposable
« Reply #16 on: April 16, 2007, 10:41:17 AM »
Do the cloth pads actualy work when it comes to heavy clotty periods? Do they do a good job of containing the blood so it isnt running all over the place and staning the clothes?

Im just wondering. Someday my daughters will have periods. And I remember what it was like as a teenage girl to worry about having period stains on the pack of my paints.

When it comes time for them to have their periods I dont want them to use the diva cup because its kind of grose and creepy. Perhaps I just need to learn more about it. I dont understand how it can be comfortable and safe to hold in all the blood and clots?


My first reaction to cloth pads was... GROSS :o :o :o :o :o - but I am reformed, I love mine.  They are so comfortable - never thought I would say that - and my periods are much lighter and less cramping, etc...  I would highly recommend cloth pads for anyone.  Hope that helps.

Kaira

Offline Julia

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Re: Sanitary Products: Cloth vs Disposable
« Reply #17 on: April 17, 2007, 05:31:59 AM »
 
Quote
Disposable feminine hygiene products are a big scam perpetrated by manufacturers who want to keep us on a leash so we have to keep buying their products.  They are making as much as TEN to TWENTY Thousand dollars per woman over her lifetime.  If you think of the millions of women in the USA alone, the profits are staggering!


The rest of the article is good, but $10,000-20,000 seems like a bit of an exaggeration! If the average woman has about 30 years of periods, that would be 360 periods. To spend $10-20K that would be $27-53 in pads and tampons for every period!

Offline BJ_BOBBI_JO

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Re: Sanitary Products: Cloth vs Disposable
« Reply #18 on: April 17, 2007, 08:11:08 AM »
I forgot to mention that back in the old days when my mom was young ( she is in her 70s now) her and her 7 sisters and my grandma all wore pads made of rags and cloth.



 She said that they were all always having to wash rags and it was discusting but something they had to do. There was always rags out on the line drying so no dout the neighbors always knew about their periods especially with 8 females all at home menstruating! LOL. It
added to a lot of extra laundry to have to do for everyone. And those ever dreaded embarrassing period stains on the clothing would happen more often.







She also said that at that time her flow was just regular and even then she had to change the cloth pads often and would soak threw the cloth pad.  and they used pins to hold the pads in place. So I would think that someone with very heavy periods would have to change their  cloth pads all the time?



 She was very happy when she was adult and the stores started selling disposable pads.


I just don't agree with that site when it says that each woman pays that much for pads in their life time. I know its just an estimate but even then its wrong. When I had periods I only spent about $6 a month on pads. That is because I used the bulky generic types.





Offline ladyhen

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Re: Sanitary Products: Cloth vs Disposable
« Reply #19 on: April 17, 2007, 08:26:15 AM »
For me, with three daughters the cost is a BIG factor.  
Also, we have many severe chemical sensitivities and allergies as well as a strong desire to live as self-sufficient a lifestyle as we can.  I like knowing what I am in contact with is safe for me.  Thank God for Maytag!  With a waterproof layer in the snap-on pad holder, we have less problems with leaking that when we use disposables.  
But of course, I'm an old hand at washing nasty things after 5 children in cloth diapers!  I really don't mind the washing, and any inconvenience seems to me to just be a matter of how you look at it.  For us, the benefits outweigh the nuisance.
  
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Offline Gigi

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Re: Sanitary Products: Cloth vs Disposable
« Reply #20 on: April 29, 2007, 12:02:21 PM »
When I have a period, after about 3 or 4 days I start getting all itchy. I use diposable pads. I change them often and take a shower every day. Am I allergic to the pads? Is this normal? Thanks.
Just wanted to bump this up and see if ANYBODY knows??? It is very annoying!

I know this is old, but I had a terribly itchy problem from my pads as well.  Though I am certain that non-disposable pads would alleviate this, I found great relief even while using disposables with ACV rinse.

I started using the ACV rinse all over "down there" and let it air dry - HUGE difference.  Just use a little paper to keep "things" under control while you let it air dry. 

Credit for the ACV rinse goes to all these great Welltellers - I don't know who originated this recipe, but I use about 3 Tbs ACV and about 3 cups of water in a spray bottle.  I use it all over out of the shower and let it air dry.  Great stuff.

Seriously try this if you have the itchy problem! 

HTH

YoopreMama

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Re: Sanitary Products: Cloth vs Disposable
« Reply #21 on: May 25, 2007, 01:40:00 AM »
I know this is old, but I had a terribly itchy problem from my pads as well.  Though I am certain that non-disposable pads would alleviate this, I found great relief even while using disposables with ACV rinse.

I started using the ACV rinse all over "down there" and let it air dry - HUGE difference.  Just use a little paper to keep "things" under control while you let it air dry. 

Credit for the ACV rinse goes to all these great Welltellers - I don't know who originated this recipe, but I use about 3 Tbs ACV and about 3 cups of water in a spray bottle.  I use it all over out of the shower and let it air dry.  Great stuff.

Seriously try this if you have the itchy problem! 
I must 2nd this enthusiatically!  ;D

I'm using it for a skin rash that is quite itchy (after exhasuting many other options).  I skip the soap, too.  Disposables made me itchy once a month faithfully.   :P

Offline KJB1611

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Re: Sanitary Products: Cloth vs Disposable
« Reply #22 on: January 14, 2008, 07:27:44 AM »
How do the cloth pads work post-partum?  I'm due in six months and if they work good want to have them ready because the disposables are horrible.

Offline MommyGus

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Re: Sanitary Products: Cloth vs Disposable
« Reply #23 on: January 14, 2008, 09:50:12 AM »
Hey there.  I just wanted to post and say that I am sold on cloth pads.  I had some old towels around here that I was going to cut up and make into washcloths.  I allready had too many of those, so I thought I would try to use them to make my own cloth pads.  I had plenty of cotton flannel here that I had gotten on sale a while back, so I set to work and made a few.  I could not believe the difference!!  I bled so much less!  I noticed a difference in the same day when I changed from a cloth to a disposable pad. Wow.  
I got my pattern here www.tinybirdsorganics.com/organiccotton/clothpads.html.  I think the hillbillyhousewife has one too if I am not mistaken.  It was easy to make.  If I can make these anybody can (I am not that great of a seamstress).  I tweaked the pattern to my liking and I think I found what will work best for me.  
I always have problems with a raw itchy bottom during my period, but that is gone!!  I hated it after my last few births. I didn't think I was ever going to stop bleeding (not to mention the sore bottom).  Now I think that it was from the pads.   It will be interesting to see if I had another baby if there is a big difference in the bleeding.  
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Offline lotsagirls

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Re: Sanitary Products: Cloth vs Disposable
« Reply #24 on: January 14, 2008, 10:35:19 AM »
   It will be interesting to see if I had another baby if there is a big difference in the bleeding. 

I just started using cloth after having my fifth.  I usually bleed for at least four weeks after delivery.  With this one it was less than two weeks.
Lo, children are an heritage of the Lord: and the fruit of the womb is his reward.  Psalm 127:3

Offline mhsmama4

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Re: Sanitary Products: Cloth vs Disposable
« Reply #25 on: January 14, 2008, 01:14:58 PM »
How do the cloth pads work post-partum?  I'm due in six months and if they work good want to have them ready because the disposables are horrible.

I'm using them post-partum this time (delivered a week ago today) and they are working great.  Mine are homemade in the style of Happy Heiny's and I wore the "overnight" kind all the time for a few days and now only need them at night.  They're definitely more comfortable.

Offline Roehrmomma

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Re: Sanitary Products: Cloth vs Disposable
« Reply #26 on: May 16, 2008, 03:37:04 AM »
Mrs. B

 I totally understand your not liking the idea. I did not either. (I was 100% tampon too!)But made the switch cause I was needing to be cheaper and healthier. I was amazed that they were drier and cleaner feeling than with commercial pads. It was nice. I think after you try them you will be surprised and pleased.

  My pads I bought were from Lotions and Notions.

Emily

Offline grocerygetter

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Re: Sanitary Products: Cloth vs Disposable
« Reply #27 on: May 16, 2008, 05:47:46 AM »
Ok, I too am not a cloth user, yet.  However, I read somewhere just recently the cost of sanitary pads for the average woman over her life and it was HUGE!! Why am I wasting all that money?! I'll see if I can find the amount again...

$10-20,000!! over a lifetime hillbillyhousewife.com

I'm going to have to convert, huh!? First I must prep dear hubby for this though :)
« Last Edit: May 16, 2008, 05:50:24 AM by grocerygetter »

Offline mommyoftwins

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Re: Sanitary Products: Cloth vs Disposable
« Reply #28 on: May 16, 2008, 06:59:37 AM »
I'm going to have to convert, huh!? First I must prep dear hubby for this though :)

I don't think I would fill him in on all the details, though!  :-[ When I was just thinking about it, he said, "That's okay, you don't need to discuss this with me. Whatever you want..." :D

Offline herbalmom

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Re: Sanitary Products: Cloth vs Disposable
« Reply #29 on: May 16, 2008, 07:07:32 AM »
Ok, I too am not a cloth user, yet.  However, I read somewhere just recently the cost of sanitary pads for the average woman over her life and it was HUGE!! Why am I wasting all that money?! I'll see if I can find the amount again...

$10-20,000!! over a lifetime hillbillyhousewife.com

I think I posted this before but that amount can't be right. Even at $10 a month it's $120 a year. $120/year X 35 years= $4200 & that doesn't count pregnancy, nursing, etc. Besides, $10 a month is higher than what it usually costs anyway. Not that $4200 is cheap but it's nowhere close to $10-20,000. Just my .02. Blessings ~herbalmom