Author Topic: OLIVE OIL: types, benefits, and uses  (Read 7342 times)

Offline milmuth

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OLIVE OIL: types, benefits, and uses
« on: November 18, 2006, 01:32:52 PM »
I have used olive oil for some time now, but I am wondering what the differences are between the different types_virgin, extra virgin, light, etc?

Also, how does it compare health wise to other oils, such as coconut oil, melted bitter, etc?

How do you decide what oil/fat to use in a recipe?

Can you replace any other oil in a recipe with olive oil, or is it too heavy?

My favorite use for olive oil is salad dressing- olive oil, lime juice and seasalt yumm!  unfortunately, it isn't measured amounts-poured over salad and tossed,  so I can't reaaly share a recipe but could give more details of what I do if some wants

I also use it to grease pans and cook.  I'm not sure about baking with it, but I'd like to eliminate veggie oil completely (soy) so any input would be nice thanks :)

Offline Pastorswife2B

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Re: OLIVE OIL: types, benefits, and uses
« Reply #1 on: November 18, 2006, 03:35:58 PM »
Ok here's what I know about Olive oil (which isn't much :-) ).  Vigin means it is expeller expressed which is good, no extra heating or hydrogenation.  Regular olive oil can have a bit of a strong flavor in baked goods, but the light OO doesn't seem to have the flavor (I don't know the difference as to how it get's light).  I usually use it as my liquid oil for all recipes since it is the easiest 'good' oil to get that I know of. HTH!

-Heather

Offline Kati*did

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Re: OLIVE OIL: types, benefits, and uses
« Reply #2 on: November 18, 2006, 03:50:01 PM »
Hi...I found lots of information about olive oil at this site.  I took the quote below from the same site:

http://www.chefdepot.net/oliveoilfacts.htm

Quote
What are the differences among extra virgin olive oil, ordinary olive oil, and "light" olive oils?
Extra Virgin Olive Oil. "Extra" is the highest grade for olive oil--the best you can buy. The virgin oil produced from the mechanical pressing described above may be called "extra" if it has less than 1% free oleic acid, and if it exhibits superior taste, color and aroma. Thus, the "extra" in extra virgin olive oil means "premium," or simply, "the best."

Olive Oil. Ordinary "olive oil" is actually a blended oil product. Olive oil producers start with low quality virgin olive oils. For these oils to be fit for consumption, they must be refined using mechanical, thermal and/or chemical processes. The resulting "refined olive oil" is largely colorless and tasteless. Before the resulting product is sold as "olive oil," the producer blends into the refined olive oil a percentage of quality virgin olive oil to provide color and taste.

"Light" or "Mild" Olive Oil. Light olive oil is a variation on ordinary olive oil. Producers of this product use a highly refined olive oil, and add less quality virgin oil than that typically used to blend olive oil. The only thing "light" about light olive oil is the taste and color; it has the same caloric and fat content as other oils.
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Offline milmuth

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Re: OLIVE OIL: types, benefits, and uses
« Reply #3 on: November 18, 2006, 05:35:37 PM »
Kati*did that was a very helpful sight!  THANKS!

Offline autumnjoy

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Re: OLIVE OIL: types, benefits, and uses
« Reply #4 on: November 20, 2006, 03:40:31 AM »
I love using olive oil in my bath water. makes me very soft and great on my hair. My hair is natually dry though, so I wouldn't recommend it if your hair is at all oily. I also use it as a moisturizer on my face. works so much better than the store bought stuff and doesn't cause me to break out. My 2 cents ;D

Offline Julia

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Re: OLIVE OIL: types, benefits, and uses
« Reply #5 on: January 29, 2007, 11:39:00 AM »
Where do you all buy your olive oil for a decent price? Nourishing Trads. says it should be cloudy and in an opaque container. What about the kind in the big tin containers? Any luck with those?

Offline musicmommy

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Re: OLIVE OIL: types, benefits, and uses
« Reply #6 on: March 02, 2007, 08:00:25 AM »
I've searched but can't find the answer...I'm wondering if the olive oil from the grocery store is ok? (Pompeian Classic Mediterranean Olive Oil 100% Pure and Natural / Bertolli Lucca Extra Light Olive Oil)   I'd rather not have to order an expensive brand, if I'm getting the same benefits from the kind I have.  (It's still expensive!)  Just curious what you all use??

Offline MamaD

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Re: OLIVE OIL: types, benefits, and uses
« Reply #7 on: March 02, 2007, 08:27:59 AM »
My bottle from Sam's Club says  Colavita Extra Virgin Olive Oil.  Under the name it says cold processed, which seems a good thing, no heating hopefully.  Someone told me recently  that you should keep olive oil in the refrigerator.
Check out this website for some answers on storage and labeling.
http://www.oliveoilsource.com/olive_oil_storage.htm

It seems that virgin cold pressed virgin olive oil is the best choice and storing in a dark cool place is best.  Leaving the whole bottle out by your stove (where I have mine and will be changing that :)) is not recommended.  If you use it often the site recommend having a small amount in a container by your cooking area is ok while storing the rest away out of light and direct heat.  Long term storage suggests the refrigerator or even the freezer.

Offline beckyoto

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Re: OLIVE OIL: types, benefits, and uses
« Reply #8 on: June 01, 2008, 07:12:06 PM »
Hi all!

I know that Extra virgin olive oil is healthy, and I have seen many many recipes for salad dressings made with it.  DH and I are eating more salads nowadays and we have tried several of those dressing recipes. The problem is that neither one of us like the taste of EVOO.  It's just so strong a flavor that...blech!  I know many people love it, but it just makes me nauseous. Even just the smell of it puts my stomach in my throat.  :-\

Sooo, that said... can any of you recommend another healthy oil that we could substitute for EVOO in my salad dressing recipes? Something lighter and less...blech? :D  I would appreciate any suggestions!  :)

BeckyOto  ;)

Offline healthybratt

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Re: OLIVE OIL: types, benefits, and uses
« Reply #9 on: June 02, 2008, 05:53:02 AM »

Sooo, that said... can any of you recommend another healthy oil that we could substitute for EVOO in my salad dressing recipes? Something lighter and less...blech? :D  I would appreciate any suggestions!  :)

BeckyOto  ;)

http://www.iherb.com/ProductDetails.aspx?c=1&pid=8343149395153846595

This is lighter than olive oil, has a slightly nutty/seedy flavor (like pumpkin seeds) and has antiparasitic properties (I think).  It tastes good right out of the bottle but I have yet to try it in any recipes.  I'm confident it will be wonderful just by the taste and smell of it.  You might also consider sesame oil - nice flavor.
« Last Edit: June 02, 2008, 05:55:14 AM by healthybratt »
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Offline beckyoto

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Re: OLIVE OIL: types, benefits, and uses
« Reply #10 on: June 02, 2008, 06:02:11 AM »
Yay, I'll look for those the next time I'm at the Health Food store!  Thank you HB!

BeckyOto  :)

Offline healthybratt

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Re: OLIVE OIL: types, benefits, and uses
« Reply #11 on: June 03, 2008, 12:42:01 PM »

Sooo, that said... can any of you recommend another healthy oil that we could substitute for EVOO in my salad dressing recipes? Something lighter and less...blech? :D  I would appreciate any suggestions!  :)

BeckyOto  ;)

http://www.iherb.com/ProductDetails.aspx?c=1&pid=8343149395153846595

This is lighter than olive oil, has a slightly nutty/seedy flavor (like pumpkin seeds) and has antiparasitic properties (I think).  It tastes good right out of the bottle but I have yet to try it in any recipes.  I'm confident it will be wonderful just by the taste and smell of it.  You might also consider sesame oil - nice flavor.
Update, I tried it yesterday.

http://www.welltellme.com/discuss/index.php/topic,2965.msg186689.html#msg186689

Hubby and I were both impressed.
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Offline healthyinOhio

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Re: OLIVE OIL: types, benefits, and uses
« Reply #12 on: October 10, 2008, 05:38:14 AM »
Does anyone else get a belly ache after consuming cheap olive oil?  The first few times I thought it was a coincidence, but it keeps happening. 
If I ingest an expensive brand of EVOO, I am fine, but if I buy wal-mart or IGA name brand of EVOO, I get sick. Anyone?

Offline savannah

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Re: OLIVE OIL: types, benefits, and uses
« Reply #13 on: November 09, 2008, 08:13:30 AM »
can olive oil be used for baking, and pan frying,and deep frying. if not, what oil is best for higher temp?

Offline larissakissa

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Re: OLIVE OIL: types, benefits, and uses
« Reply #14 on: November 09, 2008, 04:55:41 PM »
can olive oil be used for baking, and pan frying,and deep frying. if not, what oil is best for higher temp?
I recently started to buy light tasting olive oil that says for sauteing,  fying and baking, and it works great for all my cooking.  I can't even taste that it's olive oil.

Offline healthybratt

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Re: OLIVE OIL: types, benefits, and uses
« Reply #15 on: November 19, 2008, 04:23:29 PM »
can olive oil be used for baking, and pan frying,and deep frying. if not, what oil is best for higher temp?
I wouldn't be comfortable putting olive oil in my deep fryer.  never tried it, but it just doesn't seem to be the right oil for the job.  I've used it for everything else in a pinch including pancakes, cakes, cookies, pan frying, baking, greasing pans, etc.

Deep Frying with Healthy Fats & Oils
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Offline 4myhoonie

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Re: OLIVE OIL: types, benefits, and uses
« Reply #16 on: January 27, 2009, 04:54:09 AM »
i got this email and i'm inclined to think it's right.  the olive oil i get from sam's club doesn't taste or smell like olive oil.  what do you all think?

Italy and U.S. Battle Olive Oil Fraud:
Are the “Extra Virgins” Even “Virgins” At All?
By the Way…
What’s In Your Cupboard?

   

By Nancy Loseke

Filed: January 27, 2009

     Italy now has food police.  And I’m not talking about the infuriating squad of nutritional Nazis who discourage the enjoyment of just about any food you can think of.  No, these guys are for real.  It’s probable they even have badges.

     In October, twenty members of a task force graduated from a special course sponsored by Italy’s National Olive Association.  Like the
über-serious “don’t-even-think-of-petting-me” luggage-sniffing canines at airport Customs, the Italian food carabinieri have been trained to smell and taste the difference between an extra-virgin olive oil and a fake—one extended by soybean or rapeseed oil, for example—and like wine geeks, can even pin down an oil’s geographical origins.

     Italy, long thought to be the source of the world’s best olive oils, lost considerable face in the international community when it was reported that some of the country’s leading producers of olive oil were perpetrating fraud on consumers there and abroad.

     Most damning was an article by investigative reporter Tom Mueller in the August 13, 2007, issue of The New Yorker (http://www.newyorker.com/reporting/2007/08/13/070813fa_fact_mueller) .  Mueller charged that only 40 per cent of olive oil sold as “extra-virgin” actually met the standards established by the International Olive Council (IOC), the Madrid-based organization founded in 1959 to “defend and protect” olive trees and olive oil—and by extension, olive and olive oil consumers.

     Mueller’s bold, pull-no-punches exposé scandalized the olive oil world, and was presumably one of the compelling catalysts for the Italian government’s decision in late 2007 to adopt new labeling laws.  Now, labels must declare where the oil was produced, right down to which farm and which press.  They must also give a precise breakdown of the oils used if the bottle contains a blend.

     That’s the good news.

     The bad news is that the European Union has already challenged the new law.   The E.U. wants compliance to be voluntary.  (Under E.U. rules, olive oil may be sold as Italian even if it contains only a small percentage of Italian oil.)  Self-policing—especially in an industry with ties to organized crime—sounds like an impotent solution to a widespread problem.

     To its credit, Italy persists in bringing olive oil villains to justice.  Last March, in a sting called “Golden Oil,” undercover police arrested 23 people and shut down 85 farms.   Weeks later, 25,000 liters of suspect oil (much of it destined for the U.S. and German market) were seized.  The suspects—40 of them from nine provinces in northern and southern Italy—were accused of cutting olive oil with sunflower and soybean oil and selling it as extra-virgin.

     “It’s a con, pure and simple, like selling Gucci which isn’t Gucci, or a Rolex which isn’t a Rolex,” said Massimo Gargano, head of Unaprol, the Italian olive producers’ association.

     Governments are getting interested, here and abroad.  But it’s too early for consumers to let their guard down.  For one thing, the U.S. never joined the International Olive Council, meaning America has always been a dumping ground for olive oils that couldn’t meet the Council’s rigorous standards.  For another, know that the phrase “Bottled in Italy” means just that.

     The weasel word, of course, is “bottled.”  Yes, the oils may have been “bottled” in Italy, but in all likelihood, the biggest proportion of the oils are from Spain, Greece, and the Middle East, brought through Italian ports on tankers.   I am not saying oils from these other countries are necessarily bad—all of the aforementioned countries are capable of producing exemplary oils—but if you are buying an oil with a bucolic Italian scene on the label—Italian oil is what you should get.  What would be so wrong with that?

     Specifically, look for oils that say, “100% Prodotto Italiano”.  Which means, “100% Product of Italy”.  And look for a “use by” date that will give you a clue as to when the oil was bottled.

     Sensitized to olive oil fraud and adulteration, two forward-thinking American states, California and Connecticut, passed legislation late last year that forces producers and importers to conform to standards similar to the ones dictated by the IOC. 

     Their motivation was not strictly economic: Olive oil that is cut with nut or seed oils, especially when their presence is not listed on the label, can cause potentially fatal reactions in people with nut allergies.  (In one of the most famous and tragic cases of olive oil adulteration, more than 450 Spaniards were killed or disabled by ingesting aniline-laced rapeseed oil that was being sold as olive oil for cooking.)

     Similar laws are under consideration in other states.  Fingers crossed that the USDA will ultimately take the reins and protect the other 48 states in the Union.

     In the meantime, what can you personally do to avoid wasting money on counterfeit or subpar olive oils?

     Freshness, of course, is critically important.  Experts judge it to account for more than 80 per cent of an oil’s flavor.  Believe me, in the great olive-growing regions of the world, the locals are wild about it.  Fresh-pressed oils are insanely bright-tasting and flavorful.

     Case in point…

     A few weeks ago, I took a marvelous bottle of just-pressed Sicilian oil to my favorite hairdresser, Italian-born Gino.  (Gino wears red-framed eyeglasses and used to do David Bowie’s locks.  I figure if he can do “Ziggy Stardust’s” hair, he can probably coax the 53 strands I have on my head into a style.  But I digress.)  At any rate, Gino’s brother from Rome visited over the holidays, and was astounded, Gino said, by the quality of the olive oil I gave Gino.  “Where did you get this wonderful oil?” implored his brother.  “It tastes like it should…like olives.”

     Now, I happen to have a secret source.  And I haven’t shared it with Gino, because then he’d probably plumb it himself and stop giving me free bottles of premium shampoo.  But I will share my source with you.

     If you’re truly interested in putting olive oils of unimpeachable quality on your table, you have a couple of options.

     You could, of course, press your own olives if you are lucky enough to live in an olive-friendly state like California, Texas, or Arizona.  This is not as far-fetched as it sounds!  A snazzy little unit for home use called First Press™ sells for around $3000 (plus shipping and handling).  It has a 4-1/2 gallon capacity, a press that can deliver 20 tons of pressure, and even comes with a dozen bottles and corks.  (Hmmm…that’s about $250 a bottle, not including the olives.)  First Press™ is available from a California company called The Olive Oil Source (1-805-688-1014).  Proprietor Shawn Addison told me this week he’s sold dozens and gets inquiries from all over the world.

     Or, here’s another—and way more practical—option that is guaranteed to revamp and invigorate your olive oil life: Follow up on the information I’m about to give you—my secret source for fresh-pressed olive oil.  You’ll never look back, never browse supermarket selections of olive oil again, never wonder if you’re going to be wasting money on oils the rest of the world would reject.

     And now, click here if you want to significantly improve your olive oil life!
   
     In a few days, I’ll be roaming via rental car Spain’s Iberian Plain in search of phenomenal olive oil from the recently completed harvest.  I’ll report my finds here next month. 
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Offline healthybratt

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Re: OLIVE OIL: types, benefits, and uses
« Reply #17 on: January 27, 2009, 05:53:25 AM »
I quit buying olive oil a long time ago because SC posted something on here about hazelnut oil being used instead of olive. 

http://www.welltellme.com/discuss/index.php/topic,19600.msg195544.html#msg195544

The oil industry as a whole is very fraudulent and I trust most of these new "fangled" health oils about as much as I trust a baby not to put things in his mouth.   ::)  There's a commercial on TV right now that starts out by saying..."We've had information on saturated fats for over 20 years."  and then it shows people eating margarine and enjoying it with little explanation to go with the opening statement.  The closing statement says "Try our product with less saturated fat than any other product."

The part they left out (omitted) intentionally (I presume) is that the information we've had on saturated fats for 20 years wouldn't cause the average person with any common sense to eat margarine, but it was pretty slick because if you weren't listening closely, you would have assumed that's what they said.   :-\

« Last Edit: January 27, 2009, 05:56:09 AM by healthybratt »
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Offline Gigi

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Re: OLIVE OIL: types, benefits, and uses
« Reply #18 on: January 28, 2009, 05:02:08 AM »
Well, I don't know what kind of a rock I've been under but this seems totally new to me!   How interesting . . .

I've known about all the standard vegetable oil issues but for some reason missed the fact that "olive oil" isn't made out of olives.   :P

Anyone have any specific recommendations for places to buy REAL OLIVE oil?  Or at least places that seem to be selling REAL OLIVE oil?

Is this same kind of besmirchment (new word!) happening with other oils?  I use a Fl@ra brand organic, cold pressed, unrefined Sunflower Oil . . . is it made out of sunflower seed oil or ear wax?

Offline 4myhoonie

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Re: OLIVE OIL: types, benefits, and uses
« Reply #19 on: January 28, 2009, 06:07:04 PM »
well, the guy that wrote the article has this "club" that you can join saying his is the high quality stuff.  i don't really doubt it, but the prices are out of this world.  here is a link that shows the prices at the bottom.

http://www.kci-com.com/lp/rr/oliveoil/oliveads.asp?

maybe through a health food co-op?
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Offline Kati*did

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Re: OLIVE OIL: types, benefits, and uses
« Reply #20 on: January 29, 2009, 06:14:08 AM »
My thought on this is to go with a company who does organic EVOO and ask them about their product.  Most "smaller" places that do organic are actually involved in the making of the foods they sell or know a great deal about them.

It seems to me that, frequently, when "bad things" happen with various foods -- such as the food poisoning people have had from almonds, spinach, peanuts, etc. -- there are never organic foods involved. I believe its because they (smaller companies going organic) know more about their product and are taking better care of it.  Obviously this isn't always the case since many major companies have jumped on the organic bandwagon just for money, but I think for most small companies that do organic it is true. 

I get Bragg's organic EVOO for a decent price from my co-op and I noticed a clear difference in the taste of the oil when I switched to it from the regular EVOO I used to buy.  It had a remarkably better taste, and I wasn't looking for it to taste any different.  Although I think they have some weird thoughts on "health", I think they are a company with integrity and a desire to see "good" foods on the market.
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Offline Whiterock

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Re: OLIVE OIL: types, benefits, and uses
« Reply #21 on: January 29, 2009, 08:07:34 AM »
I want to know if anyone is using olive oil from the U.S. We do grow olives in states like California, Texas, etc. So where's the American olive oil? I've never seen any in the stores. Is it too expensive for the places I shop?

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Offline Gigi

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Re: OLIVE OIL: types, benefits, and uses
« Reply #22 on: February 22, 2009, 02:53:23 PM »
Here's some Californian-grown olive oil that is recommended by the radiant life people. 

Radiant life:

http://www.radiantlifecatalog.com/prod.cfm/ct/4/pid/1051

Radiant life claims it is the real deal - 100% *olive* oil.  They also say that if olive oil truly is the "real thing" that it will taste like coca-cola.  Just kidding!  Instead, they say that it should NOT be clear it should be cloudy.

Bariani website:

http://www.barianioliveoil.com/

Anyone tried this stuff?